Who Are We? Colossians 1:1-8

I love the book of Colossians and am super excited that we will be in that book for the next 10 weeks. Paul lays out a beautiful picture of the supremacy of Jesus in this letter–one that I think if we truly “got” would change us to our core.

In the first message of this series, John highlighted verses 1-8 of chapter one—Paul’s greeting. It says this:

Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by the will of God, and Timothy our brother,
To God’s holy people in Colossae, the faithful brothers and sisters in Christ:

Grace and peace to you from God our Father.
We always thank God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, when we pray for you, because we have heard of your faith in Christ Jesus and of the love you have for all God’s people—the faith and love that spring from the hope stored up for you in heaven and about which you have already heard in the true message of the gospel that has come to you. In the same way, the gospel is bearing fruit and growing throughout the whole world—just as it has been doing among you since the day you heard it and truly understood God’s grace. You learned it from Epaphras, our dear fellow servant, who is a faithful minister of Christ on our behalf, and who also told us of your love in the Spirit. (NIV)

So many things stand out in this passage–
*Paul’s call “by the will of God”– Every person in Christ has a call by the will of God, including you and me.
*Paul’s acknowledgement of Timothy– Paul does not do ministry alone; neither should we.
*His acknowledgement of the believers in Colossae as “holy” or “saints”, not because of superior morality, but because of their position in Christ, they belong to, are set apart by the presence of Jesus in their lives. We too, are saints, holy–because of Jesus. Can those around us perceive that we are different? Not superior, but different.
*Paul encourages the Colossians, builds them up, acknowledges that he has heard about their faith, about their love for one another, about their hope in God’s big plan, about their acceptance of the gospel and the growth in their region because they are sharing it, about their understanding of the grace of God, and he lets them know that they are not alone–that the gospel is spreading throughout the whole world. And he mentions Epaphras, and says beautiful encouraging things about him. Building one another up, sharing life together, speaking life to one another, are indicators of the presence of Christ. Is that how we, the body of Christ, are living today? Are we known as life speakers? As encouragers?

John threw out some nuggets of his own in the sermon:

*Knowledge means nothing if it’s not connected to your heart.
*The ability to have faith and love comes from our hope–hope in all things becoming right, complete, because we know how it ends, we see the big picture and what God is doing in the big picture.
*Christianity was pushing into a world that didn’t necessarily want it.
*False teaching began to come in and Christianity was being twisted to meet the desire of the people, so Paul wrote to the Colossians encouraging them to keep Jesus Christ at the core of who they were, to shape their lives around him.
*We belong to Jesus, He does not belong to us.
*My identity, your identity is that we are followers of Jesus Christ. It’s all or nothing.

In the midst of all of these beautiful and profound things, my heart landed on Epaphras. Epaphras, the “fellow servant” of Paul and Timothy, the “faithful minister of Christ” to the Colossians, the man who presented the message of Christ so beautifully that the Colossians “truly understood God’s grace” and it changed their lives and their community forever.

We don’t know much about Epaphras. He is mentioned in one other book of the Bible– Philemon, and at that point he is a prisoner with Paul and is sending his greetings to Philemon who was a leader in the Colossian church. But what we do know about Epaphras is that he loved God, he understood God’s grace, he found his entire identity in Christ, he embraced the call of God–the will of God in his life, and he knew and presented Jesus in a very compelling way to a group of people in Colossae–it changed their lives and bore fruit.

Can that be said of us? Are we “fellow servants” with others in the ministry of sharing Jesus? Are we “faithful ministers of Christ”? Do we know and love Jesus enough that those around us can “truly understand God’s grace”? Are we in-all or nothing-as followers of Christ? Are we willing to push into a world that doesn’t necessarily want Jesus? Have we lost our hope? Do we feel alone?

John shared this video with us:  https://youtu.be/9h0zTWHQGP4

Isn’t that encouraging? While it’s true that Christianity is growing at a slower rate in the United States than our population growth, the annual world population growth is at a rate of 1.2%, and the annual evangelical growth rate is 2.6% (GMI.org) Just like Paul wrote: “the gospel is bearing fruit and growing throughout the whole world.” There is a permanency to the gospel. It is powerful, it will not be stopped, the gates of hell will not prevail against it! (Mt. 16:18)

So the question for us, who live in a part of the world where the gospel is not growing as fast…who live in a world resistant to the message of Christ (because, unfortunately, he has been so misrepresented here), are we each willing to be an Epaphras? Are we willing to fall in love with Jesus, recognize His beauty, His supremacy, ask Him to teach us to love the world, to connect our knowledge to our hearts–to His heart–embrace God’s will, God’s call in our lives,  and allow the Spirit to flow through us to those around us? May hope in the fulfillment of God’s big mission birth faith and love that leads to action in each of us.


I find myself a bit scattered as my fingers land on my keyboard… How can it be that there is so much packed into eight short verses? There are so many directions to go, points to expound on, thoughts to explore. As I read through Luanne’s words and re-read the verses a few times, one thought stuck in my mind.

All of the people mentioned in these verses were “all in”, fully committed to the work before them and fully committed to one another.

The letter is written from Paul-and he includes Timothy-to the church at Colossae. We know from all that is written by-and about-these two that they were committed to furthering the Gospel of Jesus. But what stood out to me about them in this short passage related to their commitment to the Colossians.

We always thank God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, when we pray for you… (vs. 3)

I think this short verse is so beautiful. The two words I highlighted above, “always” and “when” say so much about the hearts of Paul and Timothy toward their brothers and sisters in Christ. “When” we pray, let the church know that they were being faithfully prayed for. And when they prayed for them, it was always with thanksgiving. We aren’t privy to all of the other things Paul and Timothy may have prayed in regard to this church, but we know that they always thanked God for them. What if we prayed that way for each other? First, that we actually pray–that’s the “when”. And second, that we always begin by thanking God for whoever it is that we are praying for. Thanking Him for the work He is doing in the people we pray for, starting there. Not with the gripes and a critical spirit–with grateful hearts that can see the life of Jesus working in fellow believers. I have this feeling that if we changed just this one tiny thing in our prayers, we would find that our own hearts would be changed and our relationships would grow stronger.

And the people they were praying for, the Colossians, they were “all in”, too. John gave us a breakdown of their story. He laid it out this way:

They were once disconnected from God, dead in their sin–us too, right?

They heard the Gospel, and they accepted it. We have heard-have we accepted it?

Their sins were forgiven and they were baptized and began living a new life. Do we know our sins are forgiven? Have we been baptized and have our lives been made new?

Jesus was Lord of their life. They lived in a way that testified to His Lordship. Where are we in this step? Can people look at our lives and see us unashamedly living Jesus’s way?

John also said, and Luanne mentioned this earlier, that they were pushing into a world that didn’t want them there. We will come back to this point…

I think it’s safe to say that the church at Colossae was “all in”.

And then there is Epaphras. Luanne wrote about him so beautifully, so I will use her description again here:

“…what we do know about Epaphras is that he loved God, he understood God’s grace, he found his entire identity in Christ, he embraced the call of God–the will of God in his life, and he knew and presented Jesus in a very compelling way to a group of people in Colossae–it changed their lives and bore fruit.”

Again, he was “all in”. Paul & Timothy, the Colossians and Epaphras-all of them lived lives fully surrendered to Jesus and fully on mission. These eight verses tell us more than enough about them to come to the conclusion that they were committed. They were in. Period. No turning back. And that is why they were “pushing into a world that didn’t want them there”… and having success.

When John spoke those words, I couldn’t help but relate it to us today. As Luanne mentioned above, the United States is one of the few countries where Christianity is growing more slowly than the population of the nation. It is not at all a stretch to say that, in our present day and culture, the world around us doesn’t really want us here. I agree with Luanne that a major contributing factor is that we have so misrepresented who Jesus is and what our faith is all about, but regardless of the “why”, we are definitely unwanted in the nation we call home.

What are we doing about that? Could it be said of us that we are “pushing in” to a world that doesn’t want us, as the Colossians did? Or are we allowing the world around us to influence us more than we are influencing them? Are we being shaped by culture or are we shaping culture? As individuals and as the collective church?

I believe that the reason the Colossian church was successful at pushing into and changing the world around them was because they were all in. Their understanding of who they were-ambassadors who represented Jesus, brothers and sisters who all were important to the family of believers and saints because they belonged to Jesus-directed every facet of their lives. They got it. They accepted it. And they lived in a way that proved that they believed it.

What about us? Can we effectively push into a world that doesn’t (know) they want us? The answer, I believe, is yes. If we go all in. If we can follow this beautiful example and live fully committed lives, we can and will see the statistics in our nation and the world change for the better. I want to live an “all in” life. Will you join me?

We would love for you to enter into the conversation with us through the comments section!



Moving Forward

Rise up; this matter is in your hands. We will support you, so take courage and do it.       Ezra 10:4

Beau spoke this weekend about the importance of moving forward, of taking the next step God is calling us to take. He presented five critical steps to take to keep moving in the right direction. Those steps are:

Self-check daily. He reminded us that is necessary to regularly evaluate where we are & who we are, to get comfortable with real soul-searching. This is not meant to lead us to a place of shame or beating ourselves up for our failures, it’s simply the ability to be honest with ourselves and with God about where we are.

Seek Correction. This one is counterintuitive. We don’t love to be corrected and we tend to challenge instruction. To seek it out requires us, as Beau said, to embrace the fact that we don’t know everything. It requires humility. But the benefits of this step? It brings so much life!! Proverbs 15:31-32 says this: If you listen to constructive criticism, you will be at home among the wise. If you reject discipline, you only harm yourself; but if you listen to correction, you grow in understanding. Seeking correction is an important step in moving forward.

Create constancy. Beau pointed out how difficult this is in the culture and time we live in. In our cultural climate, perseverance and leaning into the struggle are not the norm. We want what we want, we want it right now and if our demands aren’t immediately met, we look elsewhere. We give up and we quit . Beau encouraged us to “count it all joy” when our faith is tested because it leads to steadfastness, which leads to our being made complete and lacking nothing. (James 1:2-4)

Live in community. This one can be almost as challenging as seeking correction. Most of us tend to isolate-at least when it comes to the deeper parts of our hearts. We can go to church every Sunday and still live isolated if we are not seeking out opportunities to go deeper and develop authentic relationships. Beau reminded us that it is when we confess our mess to one another that we find healing (James 5:16) and that we will not confess anything if we are not invested in real relationships with one another.

Remain connected. Beau identified this as the most critical of the five steps. He said that remaining connected in community is important, but here he spoke about remaining connected to God. He said, “We need to stop trying to lead, and embrace our dependence on God”.  In John 15:4, Jesus says, “Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit by itself unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in me”. Staying connected to God is paramount to having the ability to live out the other four steps.

Moving forward isn’t easy, but the alternative is not desirable in the least. We were reminded in this week’s message that “a lack of movement creates stagnancy”. Beau presented a comprehensive definition of the word “stagnant”.  It means, “not flowing or running; stale or foul from standing, as a pool of water; characterized by lack of development, advancement, or progressive movement; inactive, sluggish, or dull“. While I found several points in the definition intriguing, one point stood out above the rest. “Not flowing”. This may be the most obvious of the definitions, but in this context, I found it profound. 

I immediately related it to the Holy Spirit. Living a stagnant life means that I have dammed up the flow of the Holy Spirit. The other definitions aren’t pleasant, either–I wouldn’t want to be characterized as “stale” or “foul”, “sluggish” or “dull”. I don’t want my life to lack development, advancement or progressive movement. But the thought of living a life without the Holy Spirit flowing freely in and through me? I couldn’t bear a life like that. I am so aware of my lack… I know that I can produce no good, lasting fruit on my own. I need the power of the Holy Spirit desperately!!

If we don’t want to live a stagnant life, void of the flow of the Spirit, we have to commit to the process of moving forward. We have to take the steps. And I sit here and reflect on those points, I realize that none of them are possible in our own strength. To do any of them fully, we have to rely on the power available to us in the friend, counselor, presence of the Holy Spirit.

How do we remain connected to God? We embrace that we can’t do it on our own. We need help. But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you. (John 14:26)

Why should we live in community? Why can’t we do this on our own? How do we build community anyway? “In him you also are being built together into a dwelling place for God by the Spirit“.

How do we create constancy and find the endurance to persevere? Romans 5:3-5: More than that, we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.

What about seeking correction? Where do we start? How do we know if the instruction we are receiving is true? And what about the daily self-check we need? Where do we begin? We start with the Holy Spirit. When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all truth, for he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come. (John 16:13)

The Holy Spirit is absolutely essential to taking steps forward. He is our helper, our counselor, our advocate. He is our guide and he convicts us of our sins. He empowers us to move forward and it is only through him that we bear good fruit. How do we keep from becoming stagnant? We take these steps that Beau outlined for us–relying on the power of the Holy Spirit within us.

How did the definition of “stagnant” impact you? Are there any areas of your life that have become stagnant, places where the Spirit is no longer flowing? Which of the five steps is the most difficult for you? We would love to hear your thoughts!!


We were in Birmingham celebrating our granddaughter’s first birthday, so I was not there for Beau’s sermon, but really look forward to hearing it. I find it ironic, that even though I have not yet heard Beau’s words, I was in the midst of a living illustration over the past few days of the perseverance that it takes to move forward. Our sweet one year old is right on the verge of walking. Every day she practices over and over and over. She uses a push walker sometimes, but can’t yet turn it by herself, so seeks help when she gets stuck. She loves to hold our fingers and walk with that support. She pulls herself up onto furniture and walks around it, looking for affirmation from time to time. Every once in a while she lets go and takes a tumble, but she gets right back up and tries again.

Can you imagine how puzzling it would be to see a toddler who stopped trying to walk? One who decided that the progress made to this point is good enough? Think of the growth stagnation that would happen, the life experiences that would be missed out on? Yet, I’m afraid that many of us do that in our spiritual journeys.

We are encouraged throughout scripture to “walk”. Knowing that most of us walk to get from one point to another, I’m going to take the liberty to substitute the words “move forward” in the place of “walk” in the following scriptures..

move forward in the way of love, just as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us as a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God. (Eph. 5:2)

So I say, move forward by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh.  (Gal 5:16)

But if we move forward in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus, his Son, purifies us from all sin. (1 John 1:7)

I therefore, a prisoner for the Lord, urge you to move forward in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called. (Eph. 4:1)

Teach me your way, O Lordthat I may move forward in your truth… (Ps. 86:11)

There is no “neutral” in moving forward. May we cast off any tendency to be okay with where we are.  May we, with the humility of a learner,  take the hands of our Savior, accepting the support of our brothers and sisters, breathing the breath of the Holy Spirit,  move forward until the day He takes us home.

Are you moving forward? How do you keep yourself from becoming stagnant, especially in those tough seasons when you don’t “feel” like persevering?



life way

Stories from Romania

This weekend’s message came in the form of beautiful testimonies from the recent Mission Trip to Romania. I was moved to tears many times as six of our own shared about their experiences. At times, I cried with them as they shed tears. At other points, my heart was deeply moved by the goodness of God toward each one. But what I came away with was not simply someone else’s story about a trip that’s done and over. I walked away with my heart burning within me, challenged in my own walk with Jesus as I pondered all that He had revealed to these six. I am so grateful for what they brought home to us. Here is a small sampling of what they shared…

Beau stated that, from the beginning, he felt compelled to step in fully. He said he wanted to let the people he served and interacted with know him and have a piece of his heart. He wanted it to hurt when he left to come home. He also said this:

“Once I committed to giving my whole heart, it was easy to lay it all out there.”

Levi also expressed that he had made a decision at the start to fully enter in with the people around him. It had a profound impact on him. Not only did he leave changed, but with confirmation of and passion for the calling God has laid on his life. He also came home feeling convicted and challenged about his role here at home. He expressed it this way:

“Why don’t I give what I gave here [in Romania] at home? To the youth here? I hold myself back here.”

John said that sometimes God takes us elsewhere to show us what He wants us to do here. Levi’s revelation is a beautiful example of the truth in this statement.

Mark shared about how they could see the progress that had been made by teams that had gone before them, that their work would build on what had been done by others and that in the future, others would continue the work they had done during their time in Romania. He expressed it this way:

“Amazing things happen when we all pull together. It doesn’t matter what portion we build.”

These statements that I have highlighted, they’re more than a good story from a great trip. They issue a challenge to the rest of us. A challenge to love fully, deeply–a challenge to love like Jesus.

There is nothing “easy” about “laying it all out there” in our day-to-day interactions. What is easy is withholding pieces of our hearts because we’re afraid of getting hurt. We don’t want to feel the pain of giving ourselves away only to experience rejection, disappointment or the ache of goodbye. Maybe it’s possible to enter in fully for ten days on a mission trip, but to come home and give ourselves away like that here? In the places God has called us to live? That’s hard. And I think it’s safe to say that most of us shy away from living that kind of love. But isn’t love like this exactly what we are called to live out?

 Love one another the way I [Jesus] loved you. This is the very best way to love. (John 15:12 Message)

 Live a life filled with love, following the example of Christ. He loved us and offered himself as a sacrifice for us, a pleasing aroma to God. (Ephesians 5:2 NLT)

 Love from the center of who you are; don’t fake it. Run for dear life from evil; hold on for dear life to good. Be good friends who love deeply; practice playing second fiddle. (Romans 12:9-10 Message)

Love the way Jesus loved us… How does He love us? He gave his life for us. He comes to the weakest, the sickest, the unseen and gives saving grace to all who ask. Live a life filled with love, following His example. Hard. This requires commitment. A choice.

I am stirred by the way the Romans verse is paraphrased in the Message– Love from the center of who you are; don’t fake it… This is what Beau & Levi articulated in what they shared. They chose to love from the center of themselves, to hold nothing back, to be authentically who they are and give themselves away. And they came home changed and challenged to do the same here in their everyday life. This doesn’t come naturally to us as adults. We are well practiced in and conditioned to withhold pieces of ourselves. To wear a mask. To only enter in so far… But Jesus’s way is all or nothing. Partial love, giving pieces of ourselves away, isn’t love at all. Love is only love when it’s all-in, unconditional, following-the-example-of-Jesus love. This is the only love that changes lives and builds bridges. Love that binds us together as “good friends who love deeply”, who don’t mind “playing second fiddle”, who can say as Mark did, “It doesn’t matter what portion we build”, because, “Amazing things happen when we all pull together”.

As I listened to all that was shared (and I have left out so much–you should really watch this week’s video so that you can fully experience their powerful testimonies!), I had to ask myself, do I love like this? Am I willing to fully enter in–when I know there will be pain involved? Sometimes I am… but I want to do this well all the time, wherever God places me, with all people. Every single person is created by God and in the image of God. Will I choose to see the image of God in all people? To see each and every face as one worthy of love? Will I choose to move toward people, to lay myself down for people? Do I understand that it really doesn’t matter what portion we build, as long as we’re loving the way Jesus calls us to love?

John asked us two questions at the end of the message:

  1. What is God showing you?
  2. What is God teaching you about yourself?

I have some soul-searching to do and some decisions to make. What about you? How would you answer these questions? We look forward to hearing your answers!


*************************************************************************************NOTE: For those of you reading this who don’t have a connection to our church let me give you a brief back story on “the girls”. When these girls were babies, they were all chosen to be adopted by families in the USA. . Unfortunately, when Romania joined the European Union, all adoptions to the west were forbidden, so these girls were caught in a political mess. There were eight girls. Now there are six, and soon all of them will be in the states because of a new program and of a loophole that has been found. Some of the girls have gotten a special visa that allows them to live with a host family and do high school here. We tried to get one of the girls a year and a half ago, and other families in our church were willing as well,  but our state doesn’t accept that type of visa. The other loophole means that Romanian families living abroad can adopt Romanian children, so three of the girls have been adopted by Romanian families in the states.


Like Laura, I came away from Sunday’s service with beautiful nuggets to meditate on; however, the theme that God highlighted in my heart, primarily during the first service, has to do with the girls–the orphans. Young ladies, 14-15 years old now, that we have known and ministered to for a lot of years.

Mark shared that during a conversation with one of the girls, he had the realization, due to bits and pieces from his own personal story, that talking to an orphan about why we make the decision not to adopt rings hollow. And then he said:

Because the whole gospel is about adoption.

The evening that the team returned from Romania, John and I were talking at home and he was catching me up on the girls. I used the word “orphan” during our conversation, and John said that he didn’t like to use that word.  I didn’t like it either when referring to girls that I know, girls who hold a special place in my heart. Why?

The word “orphan” is all of a sudden hitting me in a deep way. Knowing these girls–and they have been well loved and well cared for by Peter and Ana, the founders of the Romanian Evangelical Medical Mission (REMM)–doesn’t erase the fact that they are still orphans, and all of a sudden I am feeling the weight of what that means…not chosen, no real home, vulnerable, alone…

Orphans– real live people. Am I willing to face the reality of what it means to be an orphan, and then face myself and my choices in light of what it means?

The world is full of children who are orphans, and who need loving Christian homes to grow up in.  I do not take that lightly.  I think that’s an issue that we all need to wrestle with and pray about, and whether we are led to adopt or not, we can all play a part in getting children into homes with our prayers and our financial support. Yet my epiphany on Sunday was that every person on the face of the planet that doesn’t know Jesus is an orphan. All of a sudden the weight of that hit me.

 But to all who believed him and accepted him, he gave the right to become children of God.” John 1:12  (Implying that those who don’t know Jesus are orphans.)

  “I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you.”  John 14:18

 “See how very much our Father loves us, for he calls us his children, and that is what we are! But the people who belong to this world don’t recognize that we are God’s children because they don’t know him.”  1st John 3:1

…”all who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. So you have not received a spirit that makes you fearful slaves. Instead, you received God’s Spirit when he adopted you as his own children. Now we call him, “Abba, Father.” For his Spirit joins with our spirit to affirm that we are God’s children. And since we are his children, we are his heirs. In fact, together with Christ we are heirs of God’s glory. But if we are to share his glory, we must also share his suffering.”  Romans 8:14-17

So, here it is; not only does God tell us, his followers, to take care of the real live flesh and blood orphans…

“Learn to do good. Seek justice. Help the oppressed. Defend the cause of orphans. Fight for the rights of widows.”  Isaiah 1:17

“Pure and genuine religion in the sight of God the Father means caring for orphans and widows in their distress and refusing to let the world corrupt you.”  James 1:27

…I believe that He wants us to see the lost as spiritual orphans and care for them as well.  This is what it means to love like Christ. 

When Jesus looked at the lost, he felt deeply for them.

Matthew 9:36 tells us:  “When he saw the crowds, he had compassion on them because they were confused and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd.”

I believe that he wants us to look at people this way as well.

So when I let both the beauty and the weight of this settle in on me, can I apply some of the things that the mission team said about ministering to orphans on their trip right here?

John said– “Always give your heart away. That’s what ministry is.” He encouraged us to give our life, our time, our fears, and our heart to God, so that we can be in a position to give those things to others–anywhere.

Beau said that leaving the girls on the last night was devastating because he knew that he may not see them again. He reminded us that the fear of pain, of saying good-bye, can cause us to hold back, but that he wanted it to hurt when he left so that he would know he came home different, he would know he hadn’t just shared knowledge, but had actually let the girls have a piece of his heart.  He chose to enter in, to speak life, to give his heart, and feel the pain of that. Could that be part of sharing in the sufferings of Christ?  Can I be willing to enter in with people even though I might get hurt in the process? Am I willing to give away pieces of my heart?

Levi chose not to hold back, to enter in fully, and was convicted about living that way “at home” as well–speaking life, speaking truth, speaking love, being fully engaged here. Am I willing to do that too?

Charity talked about how touched she was that the pastors and their wives knew the stories of the people that they ministered to, and she told of a woman who could no longer read her Bible, until the team provided a pair of reading glasses for her. Charity talked about the woman’s deep joy and gratitude, because that small gift changed her life.  Can we take enough time with people to learn their stories, and live knowing that even small gifts, small acts of kindness can make a huge difference?

Tina said about the dental work, that even though there was a language barrier, the language of touch, of care, is universal. We can speak that language no matter where we are.

And Mark said “Look for Jesus in every momentamazing things happen when the body of Christ pulls together.”

A mission trip is not about the doing, it’s about the being.

Following Christ is not about the doing, it’s about the being.

Are we willing to see those who are not yet family, who don’t know Jesus,  as orphans to be cared for, to be loved, to be spoken into with words of life, to be prayed for, to be worth giving pieces of our hearts to, to share our time with, to push past our fears for, so that we can introduce them to our Father? What are your thoughts?



Who Are You Church? Why Are You Here?

Who Are You Church? Why Are You Here? What powerful questions these are! Shane made so many excellent points in his sermon, one of which was when things get confusing, muddled, lost in details that don’t really matter–asking ourselves these two questions will cut through all the fluff and get us back on track.

The beautiful verse mash-up that he read makes it all so very clear:

You are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that you may declare the praises of him who called you out of darkness into his wonderful light, all who received him those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, members together of one body and sharers together in the promise in Christ Jesus, you are the body of Christ and each one of you is part of it.” (1 Peter 2:9, John 1:12, Eph 3:6b, 1st Corinthians 12:27)

Who are you church? Why are you here?

Church. No matter who you are, the word conjures up some sort of image, some sort of thought. To many, church is a building, a place to go. “I go to church at such and such a place.” To others it is a place to be avoided–”I could never go to church, I would never be accepted there.” To some church is the place that dictates the do’s and don’ts of life, and makes one feel guilty or self-righteous depending on the current behavioral score card. To some church is boring, irrelevant, not necessary. To others church is a habit, a social experience, an expectation. To some, church is the place to get the personal spiritual tank filled on a weekly basis. To others, church is an exercise in trying to pretend that life is perfect. But to those who seek, to those who pay attention to what Jesus teaches about this thing called church that the gates of hell will not prevail against (Mt. 16:18), church is a God-breathed, life transforming living organism, built on the foundation of Jesus,  infused with the resurrection power of the Holy Spirit to carry out the greatest mission of all—-taking the love of and the Kingdom of God to every person, tribe, tongue and nation across the globe, and every new believer becomes part of this living, growing organism. Peter tells us in 1st Peter 2:5 that we are living stones, being built into a spiritual house to be a holy priesthood. Do you see yourself in that way?

I grew up in church, a great church, but it became routine and I was nominal in my relationship with God and His church, so I became dissatisfied and bored. In my young adulthood I took a few years off, which led me nowhere good. I had no idea how vital being part of a living church was to my emotional and spiritual health until I decided to step away for a few years. Once I made a total mess of things, and truly had nowhere else to turn, I timidly re-entered the community of Christ-followers, and was welcomed with grace and joy. I began to realize that the church is me. I am the church. So, if the global church has the tasks of glorifying God and connecting with Him, of encouraging fellow believers, and of sharing Christ with those who don’t yet know him, the question becomes am I doing those things? Once I figured out that the more I immersed myself in the true mission of Jesus and His church, the more fulfilling my life became. I was hooked.

Shane made the point that the strength of the church is defined by the connections we have– not by our programs, our budget, our building, but by our connections.
Connection number one is do we have a strong connection with the triune God–Father, Son, and Spirit? Connection number two, do we have strong connections with other people in the body? Are we making intentional time for one another, fellowshipping together, doing life together, encouraging one another, sharpening one another? And connection number three, are we bringing others in so that they can connect with God, connect with fellow believers, find freedom, discover their purpose and become part of bringing others in.  All three of these connections are vital to being a Kingdom church.

It is not possible to fulfill the mission of the church without going all in. That’s just what’s true. Jesus was very clear, and modeled very clearly that his Kingdom is all about relationships, and it requires denying ourselves, taking up our crosses and following him daily. (Luke 9:23). And you know what I’ve learned? It is not a heavy weight– it is a great joy. My dearest friends, my closest relationships, are all people who I do Kingdom life with–the world can’t offer relationships like these. My spiritual growth, the woman I’ve become and am becoming are because of my relationship with God and with others in the church. And there is nothing, nothing, nothing greater than getting to be part of God’s saving and transforming work in someone else’s life. There is nothing more fulfilling than being part of God’s global work of bringing His Kingdom of justice and love to the world. There is nothing greater than watching God break strongholds, chains, do the impossible, and blow minds with how truly great He is.

So–who are you church? Why are you here? Do you see yourself as a “living stone” a vital piece in His church? We’d love to hear your answers…


Luanne reiterated in her beautiful writing the three reasons Shane laid out for why the church is here:

“…the global church has the tasks of glorifying God and connecting with Him, of encouraging fellow believers, and of sharing Christ with those who don’t yet know him…” 

Shane spent a lot of time on the second point, encouraging one another. He reminded us of the definition of the word encourage–and I’m so glad he did, because I think we sometimes forget its full implications and end up operating out of a watered down understanding of what it means. The initial meaning is “to take heart”. But when it is broken down further, it means “to strengthen, foster or advance something or someone”.

If you presented me with the three points Shane made about why the church is here before I heard the message and asked me which one I thought was the most important, encouraging one another would have been last on my list. Because, obviously, connecting with God and glorifying Him and sharing Christ are the more important pieces of this puzzle… right? Encouraging one another can feel too inward-focused, maybe a little selfish… right?

I wrestled these thoughts through as I listened. And have prayed through them ever since.  And this is where I’ve landed–

We cannot successfully connect with God or share Jesus with those who don’t know Him if we haven’t first been encouraged by other believers.

I know that is a fairly bold statement to make, but stay with me for a minute…

As I prayed and wrestled with my own thoughts, I was reminded of my own journey with God, with faith, with church. How did I get to where I am today?

By the encouragement of other believers.

I am not talking about flattery, praise, “atta girls”. I am referring to the kind of encouragement Shane defined for us. The kind of encouragement that builds off of the love Jesus was talking about in John 13:34-35:

A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another. By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”

How did Jesus love his disciples? That list is too large to cover comprehensively here. But it absolutely included strengthening what was weak in them, fostering an environment of growth and advancing them into roles and positions they could never have imagined for themselves. Through Jesus’s encouragement and example, they learned how to connect with God and glorify Him and they also learned what they would need to know to spread the gospel to the ends of the earth. The book of Acts records how essential encouragement, in it’s full definition, was to the early church:

 Acts 9:31: Paul was preaching and when he left, the church “was strengthened and encouraged by the Holy Spirit.”                                                                                                        

Acts 11:23: Barnabas (whose real name was Joseph, but he was so known for being an encourager that he was nicknamed “Barnabas”, meaning “son of encouragement”. How cool is that?? I love Barnabas!) encouraged early Christians in Antioch “to remain true to the Lord with all their hearts”                                                                                                            

Acts 13:15: “Brothers, if you have a message of encouragement for the people, please speak”                                                                                                                                               

Acts 14:22: Paul “strengthened the disciples and encouraged them to remain true to the faith”                                                                                                                                                

 Acts 15:31: People read the epistle and “were glad for its encouraging message. Judas and Silas said much to encourage and strengthen the brothers.”                                                    

Acts 15:41: Paul “went through Syria and Cilicia strengthening the churches”                  

Acts 16:5: Paul and Timothy visit “so the churches were strengthened in the faith and grew daily in numbers.”                                                                                                                        

Acts 16:40: Paul and Silas out of prison…”they met with the brothers and encouraged them.”                                                                                                                                                

Acts 18:23: Paul went throughout the region of Galatia “strengthening all the disciples”

 Acts 18:27:  the “brothers encouraged him and wrote to the disciples there to welcome him.”  

 Acts 20:1: Paul in Ephesus, “after encouraging them, said good-by and went to Macedonia, “speaking many words of encouragement to the people”

These are a few verses from one book of the New Testament, but from this small glimpse, it is glaringly apparent how important encouragement was to the furtherance of the gospel in the early days of the Church. Jesus Himself had encouraged His disciples and Paul, and they were building His Church the very same way.

Earlier, I wrote that I have gotten to where I am today because of the encouragement of other believers. No matter what age we are when we meet Jesus, we all start out as babies in our faith. I won’t speak for anyone else here, but my personal experience was that I did not intuitively know how to connect with God or how to share Jesus with the world. I had to learn. And I am so grateful for those in my life who have been encouragers to me. Those who have strenthened, fostered and advanced me. Luanne wrote:

“My dearest friends, my closest relationships, are all people who I do Kingdom life with–the world can’t offer relationships like these. My spiritual growth, the woman I’ve become and am becoming are because of my relationship with God and with others in the church.”

“…the world can’t offer relationships like these.”

She’s right. It can’t. And it isn’t supposed to. We are to love one another and to encourage one another the same way Jesus loves us. And when we do that, we equip one another to reach the world around us and we learn how to better connect with God. All of which glorifies Him and shows the world around us what can happen when we encourage one another well.

So, which point is the most important? I have to say encouraging one another. Because it facilitates the other two points. Are the other two points more vital to Kingdom living? Probably. Definitely. But we cannot get there without first learning how. And that is taught the same way it was in the early church–through the encouragement we give one another.

How did you get to where you are? How has encouragement from other believers impacted your life and faith? We would love to continue this conversation with you!



What is God Really Like?

God is really big. God can be really scary. God can be really confusing. God is in control. 

I am thankful that this week’s sermon didn’t end there. There was a fifth point that is both the foundation of and the umbrella over these attributes.

God is a loving God.

John used Zephaniah 3:17 to illustrate this point:

The Lord your God is in your midst,
    a mighty one who will save;
he will rejoice over you with gladness;
    he will quiet you by his love;
he will exult over you with loud singing.

I love that this is the verse he used. There are many others that come quickly to mind when I hear the words “God is love”. But this one paints a beautiful picture that struck me when I thought it through…

When life and circumstances loom large and we feel so small, when fears assault our hearts and confusion clouds our minds, when everything feels out of control…

Shh… listen…

Our God–who is bigger than our biggest struggles, who understands all things infinitely, who holds all of time-and all of us-in His very capable hands–comes to quiet us with His love.

Not with judgement or thundering condemnation, though it would be within His rights to come and quiet us in these ways. No, this very big, sometimes scary and confusing God who controls all things comes to quiet us with His love. The fact that He comes to us at all is evidence of His great love for us. It blows my mind that He comes to me… I’ve experienced His presence so many times, and every time I’m left feeling a little more undone… in awe of His greatness, His big-ness that chooses to come into the small space of my life. He doesn’t have to come. He could leave us as we are–small, afraid, confused and out of control. But He doesn’t. Because God is love.

The verse doesn’t only tell us that God quiets us with His love, it also tells us how. He quiets what is loud around and inside of us by the sound of His own voice. He quiets us with singing. He rejoices over us with gladness. And he exults over us with loud singing. This is the definition of “exult”:

“to show or feel a lively or triumphant joy; rejoice exceedingly; be highly elated or jubilant”

Truthfully, I can’t wrap my mind around this concept. That His singing over me is triumphant, joyful, jubilant, elated… It’s more than I can fully comprehend. I’m still working it through. But I know it to be true. While I have never audibly heard God sing over me, I have experienced being quieted by His love…

There are times I have been left speechless, in awe of His big-ness. I have been afraid to speak, reverent in His presence. I have given Him the silent treatment in my confusion and lack of understanding. And I have run from Him, refusing to speak or listen when I wanted to control my own life. I have been quiet in these ways. But there is only one thing that can quiet my heart, my innermost thoughts and fears, my wonderings and wanderings. Only one thing that can cause the inner clamor to cease. That one thing is His love. There’s nothing like it.

I am thankful for the enormity of my God. I am grateful that there are things I don’t understand, even if it leaves me feeling confused sometimes. I am so, so glad that He is in control-because I know my own lack, and I don’t want that responsibility… even when I do. And I’m glad my God can be scary, because so is my enemy. So are many of the things I face on this earth. But if I didn’t know that He defines Himself as love, these attributes wouldn’t produce worship in my heart. Because I know Him, because I’ve experienced His love that quiets what wars inside of me, I can praise Him in all of His big, scary, confusing, controlling Glory. Even if I don’t always like it. Even if I don’t understand. Because no one loves me like He does. No one ever will. So I trust Him with the rest.

How about you? How do you see God? How does it make you feel to know that our big, scary, confusing, in control of everything God sings over you with love?


Laura wrote,

“There is a fifth point that is both the foundation of and the umbrella over these attributes: God is a loving God.”

We have to know that. We have to trust that it is true. John reminded us of the Charles Spurgeon quote that encourages us to trust God’s heart when we can’t trace God’s hand. In other words, when we don’t understand what God is doing, what God is allowing, we still trust that He is good, that He is for us, that He knows what He is doing, and that we are completely surrounded by and filled with His love for us. Those moments when He seems scary, when He seems confusing, when He seems controlling, we have to know that He is a loving God and that we can trust His heart.

I had not experienced the “scary” part of God until a few years ago. I was a chaperone on a youth mission trip to Costa Rica. We were staying in a remote location—our “home” for the week was across a dirt street and through a small swath of rain forest from a thin strip of beach–very remote.

One morning before heading to the worksite, we had a few minutes to go to the beach. I was already dressed and chose not to get in the water, but most of the rest of the group did. The water was a little rough, so the group went in about thigh deep, held onto each other in one long line and jumped together as the waves came in. All of a sudden, it was as if someone had thrown a bowling ball at the group and our youth and adults were scattered in all directions. I counted heads and we were missing one. I shouted in a panic to our youth leader that we were missing one, and then  saw the head of that young man so far out in the water that I feared we would not get him back.

Even the kids and adults close to the shore were having difficulty getting to the beach. I ran for help. I came upon a Costa Rican lady and communicated with her that we needed help. She told me that there was no help. I ran back to our group and told the two youth leaders, who were still struggling in the water, that there was no help. A few kids were making it to shore and I screamed at them, “PRAY, PRAY, PRAY!!”  They dropped to their knees and prayed. One of the other leaders who, like me, had chosen not to enter the water was a Marine. He swam out to the young man who had been carried the farthest, but knew he would not be able to bring him in. He chose to stay with him until he went under. The situation was terrifying, life threatening, and impossible.

As we were crying out, God provided us an angel. She came out of the rain forest dressed in a red bathing suit, walked to me, told me her name was Bridget (which I looked up later and it means, “power, strength, vigor, virtue, or exalted one”), had me point out the young man in the water and then entered the water. Not one of us can explain what happened next, but all of a sudden every person in our group, including our marine and the young man who was close to drowning at that point, were on the shore, and Bridget was gone. There is no explanation for any of this except God’s intervention.

The previous morning, in my time with the Lord, he had led me to Psalm 18. I didn’t know why until the following morning, and I read this passage to the group:

… I called to the LORD, who is worthy of praise, and I have been saved from my enemies.  The cords of death entangled me; the torrents of destruction overwhelmed me.
 The cords of the grave coiled around me; the snares of death confronted me.
 In my distress I called to the LORD; I cried to my God for help. From his temple he heard my voice; my cry came before him, into his ears… The LORD thundered from heaven; the voice of the Most High resounded… He reached down from on high and took hold of me; he drew me out of deep waters. He rescued me from my powerful enemy, from my foes, who were too strong for me…. 

For the next 24 hours the sea was angry. It was churning and there was a moaning, creaking, groaning sound that I had never heard the ocean make. It was very eerie, and it left me frightened. The whole experience had left me frightened.  We had experienced a terrifying event that we had absolutely no control over. We were up against a power too great for us.  And even our relief, our incredible gratitude at God’s intervention was tinged with the thought of “Who are You, God?”. Mark 4:41 tells us that  The disciples were absolutely terrified. “Who is this man?” they asked each other. “Even the wind and waves obey him!”  (NLT)  I get that, and truthfully, I needed to get that.

The following morning, I took my Bible and walked over to that strip of beach by myself. The sea was still churning and wild. I sat on a log and said to God, “I feel afraid of You. I have never seen You in this way, and I am frightened.  I don’t want to be afraid of You, but that’s how I feel.”  Then I looked to my right, and just a few feet from me was a puppy trying to pounce on insects. It made me laugh. In that moment God spoke to my heart. He confirmed that He is big, powerful, scary AND that He is also the God who created puppies for my delight. My heart calmed as I began to wrap my mind around this new revelation of God.

I learned later, that the young man whose life was in danger had asked God to show him if He was real. May I say–God left no doubt. God, in answer to a young man’s prayer, allowed all of us to experience a situation that not one of us was powerful enough to do anything about. We could not control one teeny piece of what happened that morning, and God blew our minds with His provision, His power, and His greatness, and gave us an entirely new vision of who He is. I needed to be reminded, even though I have a close, precious, intimate relationship with God, that He is still a God to be revered, He is still an awe-inspiring sometimes fear-inducing God, He is huge, AND I can trust His heart because I know that He IS love

So when the waves are churning, when the sea is angry, when the storms are raging, when life is hard and you feel like you are going under, do you trust His heart? Do you know that you know that you know that He IS love? That He is ALWAYS love? We will never fully understand all of God. If we could, He would not be God. But we can know that He is love and that we are loved. I’d love to hear how He has blown your mind with His greatness and His love.