Colossians 3:12-14

Last week, we talked about “putting to death” and “taking off” our old selves (Colossians 3:5-9) so that we could “put on the new self, which is being renewed in knowledge in the image of its Creator” (vs. 10). The “new self” begins on the inside. It’s a core change. One that we cannot effect on our own. As John said last week, this kind of change happens when we make “a choice to yield, not to do more”. We can’t “do” our way into the “new self”. It doesn’t happen by our striving or in our own strength. Ephesians 2:8-9 describes it this way:  For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God—not by works, so that no one can boast. The new self has its origin at the moment of salvation and continues to be made into the image of Christ through the lifelong process of sanctification, becoming like Him. When verse 10 admonishes us to “put on” the new self, the Greek word that is translated is “endyo”. The first definition given is “to sink into” as into a garment. Hang onto that for a minute…

This week’s sermon covered three verses. These verses detailed what we are to “clothe ourselves” with as we live from our new self, having taken off the old.

Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. Bear with each other and forgive one another if any of you has a grievance against someone. Forgive as the Lord forgave you. And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity.

Confession… the words “clothe yourselves” in this passage tripped me up. A lot. I struggled with the wording and the feeling that I am weak in so many of these areas, especially as we explored what these 7 (or 8, depending on how you count them…) “garments” actually mean when applied as intended. Here’s the truth: I am weak in most-if not all-of the seven areas. Here’s what’s also true: I don’t have to do this by myself. None of us do.

The following is a mixture of facts I’ve learned as I’ve studied and thoughts that I absolutely can’t prove, but they make sense to me. I am no theologian and some of this is, admittedly, over my head. So I invite you to take this journey with me and also to comment with your own thoughts, insights and questions. I would love to learn from all of you!!

Okay, remember that Greek word, “endyo”, from last week’s passage? It’s the same word that is translated “clothe yourselves” in verse 12. When I use what I know to define “clothe yourselves”, it absolutely leads me to believe this is something I must do. In my own power. I wrestled with this, and came really close to shaming myself for my shortcomings all afternoon and evening after listening to the sermon. But if we look at the definition given for “endyo” being “to sink into” as into a garment, the whole passage lands a little differently…

First, we have to remember that, as John presented last week, neither salvation nor the sanctification process are things we “do” in our own strength. We do have to cooperate in the process, but it is through the sacrifice of Jesus that we are saved and by His Spirit working within us that we are continually changed and made into His image. This week’s passage is not a brand new thought, but rather a continuation and further explanation of what we explored last week. The moment we put off the old self and “put on” the new self, we are covered by the blood of Jesus. It is the blood of His sacrifice that identifies us “as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved” (verse 12). This is our core identity. Everything we do flows out of this core of knowing who we are. This concept is foundational to our understanding of the next piece…

The “garments”–compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness,  patience, forbearing & forgiving, and love–are not articles of clothing we can manufacture on our own. Interestingly, five of these words share the exact same root word in the Greek as five of the fruits of the Spirit (Galatians 5:22-23), and a strong case could be made connecting two more sets of the words. We know that these “fruits” are the outward production of work that the Holy Spirit is doing in our core as He transforms us into the image of Christ, piece by piece. That’s why they are fruits of the Spirit–not fruits of hard work, rule-following or righteous living. The fruit is not produced by our doing anything-other than cooperating with the movement of the Spirit within us. So it would make sense to me that these garments are also not things we can clothe ourselves with in our own power. Rather, I see it this way: Just as a parent would do for a small child, God has both provided and laid out for us an outfit that He has deemed appropriate. It is beautiful. It is the right size. When worn as intended, it’s not cumbersome. In fact, it’s an outfit that is so comfortable that, when it is worn correctly, we can sink into it. It feels good on-because it is royal clothing, made of the finest thread and highest quality materials. But we need help to put it on. It has many pieces and layers. And only the Designer knows how to put it on perfectly, with all of the pieces in place.

Like a toddler, we can choose to run away and refuse to dress in what has been provided. We always have the choice to cooperate with God’s work in us or not. He will not hold us down and dress us if we’re acting like rebellious toddlers. Nope. He’ll let us run around in our diapers making spectacles of ourselves. He doesn’t stop us from acting unruly or even from misrepresenting Him in what we choose to wear-or not wear. He will continue to hold in front of us the beautiful garments He has designed, always beckoning us back to Him and His way.

However, if we choose to yield–to allow the Designer to dress us in His perfect garments, outer manifestations of deep inner work–we will find ourselves sinking deeper and deeper into Jesus Himself. Because, what don’t you see when you’ve put on seven pieces of clothing and wrapped them all in a cloak…? You can’t really see you anymore, can you? That’s the picture I’m left with at the end of all of this…

If we cooperate with God to dress our new selves in the garments He has chosen for us–these attributes the Spirit has worked from the depth of our core outward–and we wrap our whole selves in a cloak of love, which “binds them all together”, then we don’t really look like ourselves anymore. Because we become hidden in the likeness of Jesus. It changes the way I read these two verses:

For you died, and your life is now hidden with Christ in God. Colossians 3:3 NIV

 My old self has been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me. So I live in this earthly body by trusting in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me. Galatians 2:20 NLT

I want to wear the royal garments that come with being a holy and beloved child of God. I want to cooperate as He dresses me in His attributes. I don’t want to fight that process. And I am so thankful that I don’t have to do it on my own… That this daughter that can sometimes act like an unruly toddler has a Daddy who is willing to help her get dressed the right way–His way.

–Laura

Laura wrote: “This week’s passage is not a brand new thought, but rather a continuation and further explanation of what we explored last week. The moment we put off the old self and “put on” the new self, we are covered by the blood of Jesus. It is the blood of His sacrifice that identifies us “as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved” (verse 12). This is our core identity. Everything we do flows out of this core of knowing who we are

I agree with Laura. When we are faced with the virtues that Paul is encouraging us to “put on”,  I am fully aware that in my own strength I can do some of them some of the time…all of them all of the time–not so much. That’s frustrating and defeating if all I choose to look at is how I continually fall short.  But here’s what’s true: my identity isn’t based on what I believe about myself. My identity is based on the completed work of Jesus, and on who He says I am.

In verse 12 Paul says that I am one of God’s chosen people, not in a superior way as if another is left out, but because I responded to His choosing by coming into a relationship with God through Christ.  Ephesians 3:6 in the NLT version states it like this: “And this is God’s plan: Both Gentiles and Jews who believe the Good News share equally in the riches inherited by God’s children…”  Jesus made a way for us to become part of the chosen people of God. I am so grateful!

In verse 12, Paul says that I am holy. Again, this doesn’t indicate superiority to anyone in any way, because it too is a work of God through Christ. Speaking of Jesus, the writer of Hebrews says “For God’s will was for us to be made holy by the sacrifice of the body of Jesus Christ, once for all time.” (Verse 10).  So, we are holy. However, we also grow in holiness. The apostle Peter reminds us to “Be holy, because I (God) am holy.” (1 Peter 1:16)  I think we have a tendency to mystify this word, but in its most simple form it means to be different. The definition means “set apart”. In a Bible study I participated in a few years ago, the teacher said that to be holy is to be “other”.  She referred to the holiness of God as the “otherness” of God. No one else is like Him. We who are in Christ have the Holy Spirit living in us, and He equips us to live differently. Just like Laura said above, as we surrender to the work that God wants to do in our lives, as we draw close to Jesus and let the Spirit have His way, the fruit that is produced is different from the fruit produced by our flesh. We are “different”, we are (and are becoming more) compassionate, kind, humble, gentle, patient, forgiving, and loving as we let the Spirit have His way.

And in verse 12, Paul calls us dearly loved–beloved.  “Be” is a state of being, so when God says I’m beloved, loved is my state of being. We are loved. Period. And Paul lets us know in Romans 8 that nothing  will ever separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord. (Romans 8:39)

In Romans 13:14 Paul tells us to “Clothe yourselves with the Lord Jesus Christ, and do not think about how to gratify the desires of the flesh.” 

I truly believe that the key to all of the virtues that Paul is encouraging us to put on, the key to the fruit of the Spirit flowing organically out of our lives, is to respond to God’s love for us with deep love for Him. We must understand that Jesus is not only Savior, but He is Lord.  He is also our treasure. Once we get that figured out, being in love with Him, choosing to love Him becomes our desire. And then, we want others to experience it too. We want to leverage our lives so that others can know that they are chosen, holy, and dearly loved. It ALL starts with our true identity. Believing it, choosing to live from it, and staying connected to Christ. As we allow Him to do His work in us, He changes us. I don’t know how He does it, but He does. I know this because I’m not who I used to be. So…on this side of heaven we may not do it perfectly, but are we growing in Christ? Look back over your life. Are you different than you used to be? If so, you can know that Jesus is transforming you and His fruit is flowing out of you. It may not be a bumper crop yet, but persevere! He’s not finished yet!

–Luanne

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One thought on “Colossians 3:12-14

  1. Royalty is nothing anyone gets to choose to be born into. We either are…or we aren’t. Therefore, there are no pats on the back for Prince William or Princess Charlotte. They were born into a royal family and that made them princes and princesses. Well, we, by the sacrifice and grace of God, have been born again but this time into a royal family—THE Royal Family. While I’m not an expert on protocol for the “royals” I’ve read enough to know that the royals have people who put on their clothes for them. Yes. They bend the arm or lift the leg but they are “clothed” by someone on the outside of them. We are too…but we are clothed by the Holy Spirit of God…not a servant.

    The thing that makes them royalty is what makes us Holy. We are, “other than”. We are children of the King of Kings. I’m an independent sort, but I have no desire to ever try to clothe myself with the garments John talked about. It wouldn’t be a pretty sight, nor would it work.

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