A New Foundation (Colossians 3:17-23)

There are times in my life when I know that God is doing a huge thing. I am in one of those seasons, and it is beautiful and challenging at the same time. I have done more “on my face” repenting of things in the last few months than I have maybe in the last 5-10 years.  And God has been rocking my world with new insights in scripture that have sometimes left me trembling.

John’s sermon this morning took us through Colossians 3:17-23. Verse 17 says “And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the LORD Jesus…”. And verse 23 begins,Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as working for the LORD…”  

In between those two verses Paul mentions people who had previously been invisible…wives, children, slaves…and gives husbands/fathers a new directive.  The fact that these people groups are mentioned is evidence that something new is going on, which goes back to “there is neither Jew nor Gentile, neither slave nor free, nor is there male and female, for you are all one in Christ Jesus.” (Gal. 3:27-28)

Earlier last week, when I was getting prepared for a devotion, the Lord took me to Genesis 1:26-27 which is a very familiar passage. It says, “Then God said, ‘Let us make mankind in our image, in our likeness, so that they (the human race) may rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky, over the livestock and all the wild animals, and over all the creatures that move along the ground.’ So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them.”  

I’ve known these verses a long, long time, but this time God showed me something new, something huge. God tells the human race what portion of His created world that He has given us to rule over–and it doesn’t include other humans. Not men ruling over women, not whites ruling over non-whites, not rich ruling over poor, no one ruling over no one. In God’s perfect design He rules us, we rule together over the rest.

John reiterated this in his sermon when he said in Christ all of life has a new center of reference, a new Lord, and a new understanding of reality.

A new Lord. Look back at verses 17 and 23 of Colossians 3. Both imply living a new way that affects all of our actions, all of our words, all of our effort because Jesus is our Lord. So what does Jesus being Lord really mean?

I read a book recently called “The Myth of Equality” by Ken Wytsma, and in the book he points out that the “sinner”s prayer” is not actually in the Bible and he says, “I know from experience that we can have a personal relationship with Christ. The danger, however, comes when asking Jesus “into your heart” is reduced to merely a transaction of spiritual goods and rights. This is especially dangerous in a consumeristic society that places more emphasis on individual rights than on responsibilities.” Wytsma also says, “As often as we hear about accepting Jesus into our heart, this is not the usual salvation language found in the Bible. Scripture most often uses the image of our being found in Christ.”

When I read that I had to sit back and ponder it for a moment. I went to a verse that is often used to bring people into relationship with Christ, Romans 10:9 “If you confess with your mouth, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.”  I stared at it asking God what He wanted me to see, and this is what He revealed. The focus of this verse is the Lordship of Jesus. I’ve heard the verse presented many times with the focus on the mouth and the heart, but what brings us into relationship with Christ is submitting to His Lordship. And do you know what is written three verses down? Romans 10:12 which says, “For there is no difference between Jew and Gentile–the same Lord is Lord of all and richly blesses all who call on him…”  Truly, each of us submitting to the Lordship of Christ is the only way true Christianity can work.

So the question for us is who is Lord? Jesus or self?  Do we put ourselves in a position of superiority over others based on skin color, financial position, job status, what neighborhood we live in, what country we’re from, who we voted for, which channel we get our news from, what school we go to, or any other thing?  John pointed out that a great test of this is paying attention to how we compare ourselves to others. Comparison is a great indicator that there may be some “lording it over others” going on.

This weekend ugly “superiority” violence spilled over on the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia. Blood was spilled, life was lost, and terror gripped many. Man’s way leads to destruction. Ruling over one another leads to destruction. Submitting to the authority and Lordship of Jesus leads to the beauty of diverse community, of a united body where each member is seen, loved, heard, and valued–where everyone’s gifts are able to flourish, and where the Kingdom of Heaven becomes evident and advances on planet earth.

So Paul’s wording in both Colossians 3:17 and 23 needs to be embedded deeply in our hearts—WHATEVER we do in word or in deed, do it ALL in the name of, and as if we are working for the LORD Jesus…

–Luanne

It is impossible to see the humanity in every “other”, to place equal value on all lives, to truly comprehend the need for equity and equality if Jesus is not the Lord of our lives. Paul got this. I mean, he really got this. I’ll dig into that piece in a minute…

I love that Luanne wrote about the Lordship of Jesus. In fact, what she wrote about completely redirected the focus of my thoughts and writing today.

I looked up the word “Lord” from the verse Luanne referenced, Romans 10:9. I looked it up because I wanted to know how the original word was defined in Scripture. I didn’t plan on sharing it with you, but it was so thought-provoking that I can’t not include it. (My apologies to readers who are not fellow word nerds…thank you for your patience!!)

“Lord” is translated from “kyrios”, a Greek word that means:

“the one to whom a person belongs and about whom he (the Lord) has power of deciding; Master, possessor, owner, one who has control”

The root word behind this word is “kyros”, which is simply translated “supremacy”. In light of the weekend’s horrific events, I hesitated to even include this word in reference to Jesus. But I think that it is important to our discussion to know that this word, “kyros” is only found one time in Scripture. That one time? It was used by none other than our Colossians author, Paul, in the first chapter of the book we are studying. Paul uses the word in Colossians 1:18 to establish the absolute authority, preeminence, “firstness” of Jesus. And it is from this word that we get our word “Lord”. Let’s look at that definition one more time:

“the one to whom a person belongs and about whom he (the Lord) has power of deciding; Master, possessor, owner, one who has control”

A few things come to mind as I ponder this definition… First, whether we acknowledge Jesus as Lord or not doesn’t change the fact that He. Is. Lord. Philippians 2:10-11 tells us that, “…at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord…” He is. And one day, ALL will acknowledge His Lordship. But, for now… we get to choose whether or not to acknowledge Him. Which is pretty mind-blowing. He has the power and the right as the firstborn of all creation, as the risen Savior, as the spotless Lamb and as God Himself to “Lord” over us. He doesn’t… yet. Unless we submit to His Lordship. Once we declare Jesus as Lord of our lives, we willingly assume the role of a servant in His Kingdom. We belong to Him, He owns us, and He has the power to make a decision about us. Here’s the beautiful thing about that…

He made His decision about us at the cross. 

When He chose to die for all-not just for some-He made His decision. As Lord of all, He decided that all of humanity was worthy of the chance to be reconciled to our Father in Heaven. He didn’t make allowance for one nation, one tribe, one ethnicity, one gender, one age group, one socioeconomic status. He showed no favoritism and no partiality. He bled for all. And He rose as the victorious King who made a way for all to enter in to the Kingdom He passionately ushered in.

He could demand our submission. He doesn’t.

Paul understood the power of Jesus-maybe more than anyone. He knew firsthand that there is only one way to be changed–by submitting to Jesus’s Lordship. Paul wanted us-all of humanity-to understand, to accept, to embrace the only power strong enough to not only save a soul, but change a heart, change a life.

Paul used to be Saul. Saul was righteous. A case could be made that he was the most righteous in his day. But Paul… Paul’s ministry wasn’t built on his own righteousness. His ministry was built on justice, on the upside-down Kingdom that Jesus modeled and ushered in.

Saul murdered and persecuted followers of Jesus. Lucky for him, the Lord Jesus had already made a decision about Saul when He spilled His blood for him and the rest of humanity.

Paul understood that declaring Jesus as Lord was an acknowledgement of the equality of all people.

Declaring Jesus as Lord, submitting to our roles as grateful servants on equal ground at His feet, is the beginning of heart change. Because when we declare Jesus as Lord, whatever or whoever we had given that title to previously has to go.  Matthew 6:24 makes it clear: “No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other.” There can only be one true Lord of our lives. And it’s not about what we say with our mouths-we can say that Jesus is our Lord. But if we are living lives marked by entitlement, superiority, judgment, comparison, division… we may need to take a closer look at who is sitting on the throne of our hearts.

If Jesus is truly our Lord, we will be changed, as Saul was. Once that switch happened-when Saul “asked for, prayed for” became Paul “humble or small one“, it was so much more than a name change. He saw himself differently. He saw people differently. He didn’t lord his credentials, his knowledge of the Scriptures, his genealogy. He understood that the blood of Jesus was spilled for him and for all of humanity as a means to reconcile all of us to God. He recognized, with overflowing gratitude, that there are only two levels within the Kingdom– The Father, Son and Holy Spirit occupy the top level, unified, as One. Below them? Everyone else. This concept is so important to Paul that I have yet to find a letter he penned that doesn’t exhort us to see and acknowledge the humanity, equality and interconnectedness of all people. It was that important to him, that vital to the furtherance of the Gospel of the Kingdom.

So I ask all of us–is it important to us?  Do we understand that there are no levels within the Kingdom, no jockeying for position, no superiority? Are we willing to not only alter our behavior but invite the Holy Spirit in to radically rewire our faulty belief systems? Is Jesus truly our Lord? Really, this is the only question that matters–everything else hinges on our answer. If He hasn’t been Lord of our lives, I pray that today will be the day we submit to His Lordship and allow Him to begin the transformation process within us.

–Laura

diversity

 

 

 

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