Coming Apart

How do we see Jesus? More specifically, how do we see Jesus when things feel like they’re falling apart? Do we see Him as He desires for us to see Him, or do we create distortions of who He is in light of what we’re going through?

John spoke to us on Sunday about how the apostle John saw Jesus in our series passage out of Revelation:

 I turned around to see the voice that was speaking to me. And when I turned I saw seven golden lampstands,  and among the lampstands was someone like a son of man, dressed in a robe reaching down to his feet and with a golden sash around his chest. The hair on his head was white like wool, as white as snow, and his eyes were like blazing fire.     (Revelation 1:12-14)

We learned about the lampstands last week, that they represent seven churches that Jesus had specific messages for. We learned this week that the description of the robe identifies it as a priestly garment. We’ll talk more about that in just a moment. I want to first address the “eyes like blazing fire”.

John emphasized to us that the passage doesn’t say that Jesus had fire in his eyes, just that they were like blazing fire. His eyes were like  whirling, flickering, dancing flames that held the apostle John’s gaze. Just as flames are mesmerizing and captivating, these eyes that John had seen many times before held his attention in a whole new way.

To mesmerize means “to hold the attention of someone to the exclusion of all else or so as to transfix them”.

To captivate is “to seize, capture, influence & dominate by some special charm, art or trait and with an irresistable appeal”.

So, a question for us  is, does Jesus hold our attention to the exclusion of all else? Are we transfixed by gazing into His dancing eyes? Are we captured within His gaze and do we see Him as He is, absolutely irresistable? Or do we see something else? It matters how we see our Jesus…   

Let’s go back to the robe for a bit… John talked about what we picture when we hear the word “priest”. And then he brought up Hebrews 4:14-16:

So then, since we have a great High Priest who has entered heaven, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold firmly to what we believe. This High Priest of ours understands our weaknesses, for he faced all of the same testings we do, yet he did not sin.  So let us come boldly to the throne of our gracious God. There we will receive his mercy, and we will find grace to help us when we need it most. (NLT)

This passage humanizes Jesus and allows us to think of the word “priest” a little differently. As I listened to this passage, I thought of another-1 Peter 2:9:

“…you are a chosen people. You are royal priests, a holy nation, God’s very own possession. As a result, you can show others the goodness of God, for he called you out of the darkness into his wonderful light. (NLT)

This passage is talking about us, the family of believers. We are called “priests” in this verse. And when I did a little word study, I found the word translated “priest” in both the Hebrews and 1 Peter passages are linked to the same root word. As Jesus is a priest that understands and sympathizes with our weaknesses and offers mercy, grace and help in our times of need, we are also called priests and we get to offer those same things to the world around us and to one another.

John spoke about the kind of help Jesus offers us through His Holy Spirit. It is not stepping aside and asking Him to simply fix what’s wrong. It is a partnership, working together to take hold of the problem and move it out of the way. Jesus cares about proximity, intimacy. He doesn’t need our help-He could fix all of our problems without us. But He, our High Priest, invites us to partner with Him so that we-the priesthood of believers-can learn from Him and carry Him to others.

Jesus has always been about “withness” and He still is. He didn’t need the twelve disciples in order to carry out His ministry and perform His miracles. He brought them close to Himself to love them, to teach them, to impart Himself to them. So that when the time came for Him to go the Father, He could leave knowing that He could be seen, felt, touched in those He left behind-a priesthood that would carry out the work He started.

Jesus isn’t a High Priest who intercedes from a distance. He doesn’t sit on the outside and judge us when our lives come apart. He doesn’t tell us what we should do to find our own way out. He always, always, always comes down into our mess and works with us until we can get out together. Just as He came down from Heaven to be born as a baby in a dirty manger, He comes to each of us when things are falling apart, when we find ourselves in a mess we can’t see through, a pit we can’t climb out of-and he offers His help. He sets the example of what kind of a priesthood we are to be. Will we follow His lead and get into the mess with those around us, those who need help? Will we let the mesmerizing, captivating, irresistable gaze of Jesus pour through our own eyes as we interact with the world He’s called us to love the way He loves us? What we see in Jesus is reflected in us–how do you see Him?


Laura asked us how we see Jesus. There are times that we get wrong impressions of Him. We struggle to fully understand His love, His grace, His compassion, and His “withness”. But when we sit with scripture, take it slowly, soak it in, we come to see that Jesus is truly for us. He became our high priest, not in an aloof, detached, judgemental way, but in a beautiful “I am with you” way. Hebrews 4:15-16, highlighted above, tells us that He is with us, He is for us. We don’t have to hide anything from him. We don’t have to carry anything alone. We don’t have to try to fix ourselves. We don’t have to pretend to be strong. Jesus is in our midst. Jesus is with us. Jesus has tethered himself to us and has told us that His yoke is easy and His burden is light. (Mt. 11:30) He has come to help us. And He has given us His Spirit to help us as well. Romans 8:26 words it this way: In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness…

When John pointed out that the word “help” in the Hebrew verse and the Romans verse, is the same “help” used to describe a wife, my mind went to marriage. A husband and a wife are in partnership together. In order for their marriage to work, there has to be “withness”, a belief that they are in this together working toward the same mission is to be with the same goal. The “yoke” will be easy and the burden light if they are headed the same direction, keeping in step with each other, loving each other, and communicating along the way. Laura stated it this way: John spoke about the kind of help Jesus offers us through His Holy Spirit. It is not stepping aside and asking Him to simply fix what’s wrong. It is a partnership, working together to take hold of the problem and move it out of the way. Jesus cares about proximity, intimacy…

Stay with me here for a moment. The church is the bride of Christ. So if “help” in this context means “withness”, do we see ourselves in partnership with Jesus? Think about what it implies that the apostle John saw Jesus, with eyes like blazing fire, among the seven golden lampstands—the seven churches. The groom was in the midst of the bride. Intimate partnership.

Sometimes I get a visual that’s a little hard to put into words, but I’m going to try. Jesus, with His eyes like blazing fire—the dancing, mesmerizing, captivating, drawing us in kind of eyes, is among-he is with-the seven golden lampstands. What I saw in my mind was the reflection of Jesus in the gold of the lampstands, and the reflection of the lampstands in Jesus’ eyes. There is a lot of light happening in this scene, and a lot of reflection. I was reminded that in John 8:12 Jesus says “I am the light of the world.” And in Matthew 5:14 He tell us that we are the light of the world. He tells us that if we walk with Him, we won’t walk in darkness. (Jn 8:12) And our light? It’s Him. It comes through intimacy with Him, proximity to Him, and His light reflects off of us to the world.

Laura pointed out that Jesus is our High Priest, and we, too, are priests in His kingdom, so that we can show others the goodness of God, for he called us out of the darkness into his wonderful light….so that we can let our light shine before others, that they may see our good deeds and glorify our Father in heaven. (1 Pt 2:9, Jn 5:16). No matter what season of life we are in, He is with us, he has called us out of darkness so that we can bring glory to the Father. He can use our coming apart seasons to give others hope and bring glory to God. The question is, will we choose proximity and intimacy with Jesus when things are coming apart? It truly does come down to how we see Him.

So how do we see Him? Is he hard to see? Do we see Him like one who wants to come alongside us, or do we see Him as distant? Do we filter Him through what we’re going through, or do we filter what we’re going through, through Him?

Look at Him. Can you see your reflection in His eyes? Do you see Him clearly? He is with you. Walk with Him and you will not walk in darkness. Yoke yourself to Him and your burden will be light. He is with you, He is holding all things together. (Cl 1:17) He is Emmanuel—the with us God, and He has got you, no matter what you’re going through.


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