Compassion (Like Never Before)

Leper.

What comes to mind as you read that word?

Leprosy isn’t a disease we hear much about today. Only a handful of cases are diagnosed in the United States each year, and with modern medicine, it is absolutely curable. But it wasn’t always that way…

During the time that Jesus walked in human skin, leprosy was a death sentence. It was terminal–there was no cure. But worse than the death sentence was the life sentence it carried… We picked up our story of Jesus in Mark 1:40-45 this week. These verses tell us the story of a leper. Consider this man’s reality with me for a moment…

We don’t know his name, or who he was before the leprosy. We know nothing of the life he’d lived before. He had been banished from human contact, with no hope of being touched by anyone again. Perhaps he’d been a husband, a father. If so, his family was now to regard him as though he were dead–even while he lived. Never again would he embrace his wife or hold his children. In fact, his wife may have already remarried, as she would have been regarded as a widow…

Even if someone dared to touch him, he wouldn’t feel it–the disease affected his nerve endings and destroyed his ability to feel. His leprosy made him numb. For the rest of his life… He was sentenced to a life in the shadows–and even there, people would avoid him, because they believed even his shadow was contagious. He was sentenced to a life of shame and obscurity, and who he used to be mattered not. From here on out, his identity was “leper” and “unclean”. If he dared come near a town, he’d be obligated to shout out that word to warn people to stay away. “Unclean! Unclean!” This was his name now. He lived his life as the walking dead.

Rejected. Unclean. Isolated. Ashamed. Lonely. Broken. Numb. Disgraced. Discarded. Forgotten. Unnamed. Untouchable. Hopeless…

He would live alone. And then die alone. Would anyone notice he was gone? Likely not, for his life ended the day his leprosy appeared. He had been dead to them–all of them–since then.

But Jesus…

Maybe the leper had heard rumors of this man from passers by… Maybe another leper had spoken of him… We don’t know how this man knew about Jesus, but he’d heard enough to recognize when he came near. And one day, as Jesus was traveling throughout the region of Galilee, preaching, healing, and casting out demons, this leper fell at Jesus’ feet. He knelt before the One he had heard of, grasping at hope and brimming with belief…

“If you are willing, you can heal me and make me clean,” he said. (Mark 1:40b, NLT)

Somehow, he knew Jesus could cure the incurable. He believed in His ability to restore him to health.

But maybe he wouldn’t want to…

The paralyzed, blind, demon-possessed, and otherwise afflicted had experienced healing at the hands of Jesus. But him? A leper who was already regarded as dead to his community? Maybe Jesus wouldn’t go that far.

“If you are willing…”

I can picture his eyes, pleading, daring to hope–but wide with a bit of fear… Was he crying? Did he look at the ground, or did he glance at the eyes looking back at him? If he did, did he see the deep pools of Jesus’ eyes fill as the emotion within Him surfaced? The vulnerability of this moment–for both men–causes me to pause, to linger, to imagine what each of them might have been feeling…

Have you ever pleaded with anyone? Knowing they had the power to help you, the ability to meet your need, if only they wanted to? Has anyone ever pleaded with you that way? Do you know the desperation of a moment like this one?

Moved with compassion, Jesus reached out and touched him. “I am willing,” he said. “Be healed!” (Mark 1:41, NLT)

Compassion… Pastor John spoke of compassion as the deepest of human expressions. It is a feeling that originates in the gut, more specifically in the bowels. Something deep within feels the suffering of another. It is more than coming alongside one who is suffering. It isn’t a surface emotion, like sympathy; it doesn’t carry the condescension of pity, and it doesn’t remain detached like empathy. It is entering into the suffering of another as though it was happening to you.

Jesus was filled with compassion for this man, moved by it. In this moment, it was as if he became a leper, too, and felt the hopelessness, the sorrow, the depth of his agony… Again, I imagine Jesus’ eyes as He entered into this man’s existence, knowing the man’s rejection and loneliness would transfer to Him as He granted this request… Did His chest tighten as He realized that what He felt for this man–the rejection and isolation that was headed His way as soon as people heard the news of his healing–would pale in comparison to the rejection, betrayal, and death that He would soon feel? As His compassion and deep love for humanity led Him to the end of His own life on this earth?

I don’t know the answers to the many questions this story provokes. But I do know that Jesus didn’t hesitate. Didn’t count the cost and weigh His options, though the cost to His very well-being would be extremely high. His response was not an emotionally driven knee-jerk reaction, though His emotions were absolutely in play during this interaction. How do I know this? Because of what the word “willing” means here…

In the Greek, the word is distinguished as “an active option”, and differentiated from “subjective impulse”. It means “to will, have in mind, intend; be resolved or determined, to purpose; to desire, to wish; to love; to like to do a thing, be fond of doing; to take delight in, have pleasure.”

When Jesus said He was willing, it wasn’t a flippant decision. It wasn’t a begrudging yes. It was an expression of deep love and purpose, something He was delighted to do, something that–while the cost to Himself would be very high–He was determined to do.

And He didn’t only say the words. He reached out and touched the man… 

Can you even imagine this moment?

We don’t know how long this man had suffered. How many days, months, years it had been since anyone reached out to touch him… He clearly believed that Jesus was able to heal him. But to be seen, heard, and then touched by the Jewish rabbi/God-man? Touched by this One who knew and understood that to touch him was to violate every social, medical, and religious law, rule, and recommendation regarding people of his kind? I imagine the thought didn’t even cross his mind.

Can you picture the shock on his face as the hand of Jesus moved his direction? Did he flinch, or try to move out of the way so he wouldn’t contaminate Jesus? Did he gasp or try to say something? Did he even see it coming, this collision of heaven and earth? Or was he staring at the ground, ashamed of his need and afraid of the response he would receive? We aren’t given details of the interaction, so we’re left to wonder… Did Jesus gently lift the man’s chin so he could see the love on His face as He voiced His willingness? Did He tenderly cup his face in both hands? Did he reach for his hands and lift him to his feet? Leprosy had robbed this man of the ability to feel touch. Did Jesus’ hands linger on him until he could feel the warmth of the Healer’s hands break through his numbness?

I don’t know. But every possible scenario causes my breath to catch in my chest…

Sweet Jesus, how beautiful you are… How kind… 

Touching him let the leper know that Jesus was willing to accept the cost of compassion. And it would cost Him everything, as it was the beginning of the violence and rejection Jesus would face at the hands of those He came to heal… Touching him told the leper that Jesus was willing to take his place, to share his pain, to connect with him. This went far beyond concern. Jesus got proximate to this man. He took the time to look and see beyond the surface, to listen so that He could really hear. He set aside the “wisdom” of the culture around Him that said this man might as well be dead, that he was hopeless, and beyond the reach of mercy. He chose to engage deeply enough to feel the full extent of this leper’s pain. He got close enough to smell the stench of his disease–and He continued to move toward him, not away. Because compassion takes us all the way. All the way into the pain of the one in front of us. Beyond the judgments, assumptions, and invisible walls of separation. Compassion takes us beyond our comfort zones and often, right into a danger zone. And then it takes us further… Jesus touched him…

The nuance of this story is lost on us if we move through it too quickly. Take a moment to place yourself there. If you had a front-row seat to this interaction, what would you see? Hear? Feel?

Jesus touched the untouchable… In that moment, as Pastor John told us on Sunday, the Kingdom came and invaded the life of this leper. I can’t articulate how much I love that. This story, contained in six short verses, shows us what the kingdom looks like. The way of the kingdom is the way of self-sacrificing love. If we haven’t allowed compassion to move us out beyond ourselves into love that chooses to identify with and take the place of another, we haven’t become carriers of the kingdom. The kingdom has come–Jesus brought it with Him and He modeled what it looks like over and over again. It is here, among us, inviting us to step into it, to carry it to every corner of this earth–but I think we sometimes have the wrong idea of what “Your kingdom come” actually means…

Kingdom love always co-suffers with the “other”–whoever that may be. Kingdom love doesn’t pick and choose who’s worthy to be invited in. Kingdom love doesn’t shame people to Jesus. Kingdom love doesn’t “truth” people to Jesus. Kingdom love doesn’t judge people to Jesus. Kingdom love wears the shoes of compassion–or it isn’t Kingdom love at all. 

Jesus showed us what Kingdom love looks like and what it does. It moves us to go. To go to the ones we’re told to disregard, to be afraid of, to ignore, to disdain, to stay away from. To the ones who could hurt us, infect us, and change our “status”. The Kingdom moves us to go to them, and to engage with their stories. It moves us to enter into their lives, knowing it will cost us. Kingdom love says, “I’ll take your place. My life, given for yours.”

In Jesus’ day, the leper represented the dirtiest of humanity. The leper’s level of “uncleanness” was second only to a decomposing corpse.

But Jesus… He changed everything. He brought the kingdom to this man, fully aware of the cost.

Who are the “lepers” of today? Who are we unwilling to engage with, unwilling to get proximate to? Who do we regard as “unclean”, “hopeless”, even… better off dead? Who do we judge from a distance, post about on social media, and see as less than human? Who, if we choose to enter into their lives and their pain, could cost us? Who are we unwilling to touch because the social, physical, financial, and professional risks are just too high? Who are we afraid of?

Is it the LGBTQ community? 

Women who have had abortions?

Undocumented immigrants?

Muslim refugees? 

Prisoners on death row?

The sick?

The elderly?

The disabled?

Democrats?

Republicans?

People who don’t look like you?

That estranged family member?

Yourself…?

Who are the lepers in your world? Who is hiding in the shadows, hopeless and rejected, asking, “Do I have worth?”, “Is there any hope for me?”, “Are you even willing to look at me, hear me, touch me?” What would it take for you to move toward that person, toward that group?

Jesus isn’t walking the earth in human skin today.

But His Church is.

The Kingdom invaded one leper’s life on an ordinary day that changed both his and Jesus’ life forever. We are invited, and called, as Kingdom-bearers, to be moved by compassion and love and carry that same Kingdom–the one that also invaded and transformed our lives on ordinary days–into the hardest places, to the most broken of lives.

Think constantly of those in prison as if you were prisoners at their side. Think too of all who suffer as if you shared their pain. (Hebrews 13:3, J.B. Phillips)

This verse calls us to remember those who suffer, to think about them constantly. This will cultivate our concern. But Jesus taught us by example that compassion is more than simply thinking of those who suffer. Compassion is concern that has learned how to walk, how to move and get proximate to those we think of and pray for. This is the way of the Kingdom. Walking in compassion identifies us with the One we call Savior.

Friends, we can carry healing, kingdom love to a hurting, dying world… Jesus has entrusted us to carry His kingdom–

Are we willing?

–Laura

A few years ago, I was walking to work and pondering the word “remember”. I was struck by the fact that the opposite of remember is not forget–the opposite is dismember. Hebrews 13:3, that Laura wrote above, in many other translations uses the word remember… The NLT version reads:

Remember those in prison, as if you were there yourself. Remember also those being mistreated, as if you felt their pain in your own bodies. 

That verse is the very definition of the compassion Jesus modeled. We (I) too easily dismember ourselves from the pain of others–yet Jesus says connect yourself to others, re-member, attach yourself to them. Enter into their story with them. Feel with them. Suffer with them. Become them, as much as you are able to.

Compassion is greater than pity, which can be condescending.

                          Compassion is greater than sympathy, which can be superficial.

                                         Compassion is greater than empathy, which can be too distant.

                                                                           Compassion wants to take their place. 

Is anything about compassion easy? No. Compassion is self-sacrificing. Compassion is loving others so well that we are willing to exchange our lives for theirs. Compassion looks like Jesus.

Laura wrote beautifully about the leper’s encounter with Jesus–she slowed us down, put us in his shoes, caused us to think about what he may have been thinking, feeling, experiencing. Can you imagine what his life was like?

So here he is, this total outcast who is not supposed to come out of the shadows, yet he not only comes out of the shadows but approaches Jesus. Up until this moment  in the book of Mark, Jesus has been ministering to the masses. He’s been teaching in  synagogues, he’s been healing large numbers of people. But Jesus, (I love him so much), in this moment, becomes all about the one man.  The one. The one rejected, isolated, unclean, untouchable man.

Jesus touches him. I wonder if this man who couldn’t feel felt the touch of Jesus immediately, or if Jesus gave him a moment to see that he was being touched, even while he was still diseased, and gradually let the touch become felt?  The moment of Jesus’ touch makes me think of the verse God proves his love for us in that while we still were sinners, Christ died for us. (Rom 5:8). While we are still diseased, he touches us, while we are still diseased, he takes our place. He didn’t heal the man first and then touch him. He touched him while he was still sick. He does this for us–do we do this for others? If he hadn’t/doesn’t love us in our brokenness, we have no chance to be in relationship with him. We cannot fix ourselves. And compassion like this is the proof of God’s love-if we are the carriers of His love to this broken world, what does compassion look like for us?

Compassion will cost us something. For Jesus, in this encounter, it cost him the ministry that he previously had. After Jesus asked the man not to tell anyone, but to go show himself to the priest and offer the sacrifices that were required as a testimony of his healing (vs. 44-45) the man did what we might do as well–he told everyone. The result was that Jesus could no longer enter a town openly, but stayed outside in lonely places. (vs. 45)The man, who had previously been isolated, banished to live outside in lonely places, was now free to be part of society again. Jesus was now the one living in lonely places.

There is so much in this encounter. So much. Many of us recognize that Jesus died in our place. He gave His life in exchange for ours–and we are grateful. But what He models in this story is that this very human earth life we live–he is willing to exchange for His.  I think this is a key point in what it means to be a Jesus-follower. If his life now lives in me, do I look like him?

In trying to think of people who model compassion, my mind kept going to the Ten Boom family, Christians who hid Jews in their home during World War 2. They were arrested–they knew all along that arrest was a possibility–but they were willing to show compassion, Jesus’ kind of compassion–the entering in and suffering with kind of compassion. Only one of the Ten Booms survived the concentration camp. Her name was Corrie, and she wrote an incredible book called “The Hiding Place” that tells their story.  They broke the laws of Nazi Germany in order to fulfill the law of Christ–“love your neighbor as yourself.” (Mark 12:31),  and greater love has no one than this, that one lay down his life for his friends. (John 15:13). Which laws are most important to us?

The call for Jesus-followers— we are to be him by letting him live the life that he exchanged for ours through us.

We just finished our season of 21 Days of Prayer and Fasting, and this year many of the needs we were interceding for were heavy and hard. Friday night, as I was praying, a worship song that lifts Jesus up and recognizes that He is on the throne came on. It’s a song that I usually love, but Friday I could not sing it. Instead I was saying to Jesus, I know that you are on the throne–but right now I don’t need to feel that distance. I need to know that you are right here, right now, and that you hear our cries on behalf of these we are praying for. The need felt overwhelming to my heart and I was hurting for so many.

Saturday morning, our last time together for this season, communion was being served. As I was praying, my eyes kept being drawn to the bread and the juice. God reminded me that bread and juice come from the earth–they are elements of earth. He reminded me that Jesus–our bread, our wine–is fully present here, fully human even while being fully divine. I needed to be reminded of his humanity, and I was.

After Jesus went to live in lonely places, Mark concludes this encounter by telling us the people still came to him from everywhere. Jesus had proven that he is in this with us. He touched a leper. He is here. He will touch you, and give you the freedom to touch others–not just the ones who are easy to touch, but the ones who when you touch them, when you speak up for them, when you love them, it may cost you something. It’s the Jesus way–and nothing is more beautiful.

Love so amazing, so divine

                                                                      Demands my soul, 

                                 my life

                                                    my all…

                              (When I Survey, Isaac Watts)

Re–member.

–Luanne

Image result for compassion quote henri nouwen

 

Prayer (Like never Before)

Prayer. How does one even begin to understand it? There are entire books, lots of them, written about how to pray. I’ve read a number of them, I’ve tried a number of the different methods suggested in them. I’ve searched for the “right way” to pray. And I’ve come to the conclusion that the only way to mess up prayer is not to pray.  I’ve let go of formulas, and just show up with a desire to connect with God. Some days I don’t pray a word, I just sit intentionally in God’s presence. Some days I pray with words. Some days I read scripture and converse with God as I read. Some days I intercede for the world and for people I know. Some days I journal. Some days I worship with music. Some days I read the prayers of others and make their words my own.  Most days I ask Jesus what He wants our time to look like that day. Sometimes I feel a strong sense of connection, some days not so much, but my “feelings” aren’t what my prayer life needs to be about. Connecting with my Father (which includes listening) is what prayer is about.

Sunday, in our Like Never Before series, Pastor John had us look at the prayer life of Jesus.  Last week we looked at Jesus’ authority and the long day that He’d experienced. He’d taught in the synagogue, driven out an impure spirit, healed Peter’s mother-in-law, and after dark when  “the whole town” showed up at the house, He healed many and drove out many evil spirits. (Mark 1:21-34). I imagine He was tired at the end of that day. How did he even get all of those people to finally go home so he and his disciples could rest? Do you ever think about things like that? I do.

However, the following day we learn that very early in the morning, while it was still dark, Jesus got up, left the house and went off to a solitary place, where he prayed. (Mark 1:35). In that moment Jesus was showing us the the priority of His life–His desire to connect one on one with His Father, before any other distractions of the day called to Him.

I am an early morning pray-er. I’ve learned that, for me, starting my day with Jesus, before anyone else is up, works best. However, not everyone rises early and that’s okay. Prayer is not a legalistic activity. It’s not about the time of day–it’s about the connection. Prayer is about our need to connect with the One we are following. Prayer helps us to understand God’s will and God empowers us to carry out His will as we spend time with Him.

What Pastor John showed us Sunday about  Jesus’ prayer life are that His words and actions matched. He connected both soul and body to prayer. And He connected heaven and earth in prayer.

In Matthew 6:5-8,  Jesus teaches us some things about prayer. He says:

And when you pray, do not be like the hypocrites, for they love to pray standing in the synagogues and on the street corners to be seen by others. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward in full.
 But when you pray, go into your room, close the door and pray to your Father, who is unseen. Then your Father, who sees what is done in secret, will reward you.
 And when you pray, do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words.
 Do not be like them, for your Father knows what you need before you ask him.
In other words–don’t pray to impress others, and just because someone prays out loud doesn’t mean they have an intimate relationship with God. We aren’t in a place to judge the hearts of others, but Jesus did tell us that we can have an idea based on the fruit of people’s lives. Is there evidence of Holy Spirit fruit?
Pastor John even reminded us not to say to people “I’m praying for you”,  or “I’ll pray for you”, and then not pray. Anything that makes us sound good, but not followed through with could be what Jesus was addressing, and our only reward will be that people think we’re great.  Jesus wants us to  spend some alone time with God–connect with Him in solitude–whether anyone else ever knows that we do that or not. And then He modeled exactly that in Mark when he left the house early to go pray. (Note: prayer is not legalistic and corporate prayer is absolutely something that the church does together; however, corporate prayer alone will not sustain us and help us grow.)
When Jesus left the house early, He was involving His physical body as well as His soul in the act of prayer. He got His physical body out of bed. He walked to a solitary place. He got Himself into a position of prayer, and he prayed. There was intention in what He did with His physical body. And then He connected His soul, the part of us that we can’t see–our thought life, our emotions, etc. with God. Pastor John pointed out that it was not outside obligation that caused Jesus to get up–it was the internal desire of His soul that wanted to connect with His Father that caused Him to move.
I find that the longer I walk with God the more I have that internal desire to connect with Him.  Without a doubt, there is some discipline involved in making time to connect with God, but once the discipline has been established, that time of connection becomes as life-giving as food and water. If you haven’t experienced that yet in your walk, don’t guilt yourself, just ask the Holy Spirit to give you the desire, and then follow through with intentionality. I can honestly say that I am not who I used to be. God has changed me, and it has been through my time with Him. I don’t know how He’s done it, but I know that He has. It is true that whatever we are doing with our physical bodies shows the priorities of our soul. Our inner life is reflected in our outward actions. If prayer becomes a priority, our lives will change.
Possibly my favorite part of prayer is that it connects heaven and earth. Jesus began His ministry by saying “the kingdom of heaven is here”. Somehow we’ve missed the significance of this in modern day Christianity. Our focus has become the after-life and we talk a lot about going to heaven when we die; however, that was not the message Jesus focused on, nor did the Apostles in the book of Acts. The message they preached is that God’s kingdom has come to us—right here, right now.   Jesus taught us to pray “Your kingdom come, Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven”. He taught us to “Seek FIRST the kingdom of God”-right here, right now. Christianity is not about what happens after death, it is about life right here, right now. We have got to understand this! And, I’ll say it again, we have got to know the real Jesus in order to know what heaven on earth looks like.
I write these next statements gently, knowing that we all wrestle with making Jesus in our image, but we must be willing to recognize when we have done that and change our way of thinking to reflect who He has shown Himself to be.
If the Jesus you follow is connected to a political party, either one, He might not be the real Jesus. Jesus is connected to the “party” of the Kingdom of Heaven.
If the Jesus you follow is not concerned about people who are oppressed, who live in poverty, who live in danger, who are discriminated against, who are treated as less than, and who are unwelcome, He might not be the real Jesus. Remember the lepers, the women, the foreigners, the demon-possessed, the uneducated, the outcasts who were Jesus’ friends and ministry partners.
If the Jesus you follow favors your religious denomination, your nationality, your state, your education, your points of view, He might not be the real Jesus.
If the Jesus you follow is angry about “rights”–the right to pray in public, the right to post the 10 Commandments, or any other “rights”–He might not be the real Jesus. Jesus is gentle, and kind, and concerned about our transformation from the inside out.
Following the real Jesus means that we become like the real Jesus and the kind of people attracted to Him will be attracted to us.
How do we get to know the real Jesus? Connection through prayer, through the gospels, and through the power of the Holy Spirit. Seeking God in this way, leads us to what He says is eternal life. In John 17:3 Jesus prays Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent.  
When we know Him, we know God’s will, which is to spread the message that the kingdom of heaven has come to earth, the love of God is available to everyone, we were created with divine purpose and can be part of His kingdom and its advancement on earth…and He’ll lead us every step of the way, showing us our next steps, just like the Father did with  Jesus while they were alone together.
Jesus, while he was still praying in that solitary place, was interrupted by the disciples who said  “Everyone is looking for you!” (Of course they were, Jesus had healed, and delivered people from demon possession the previous night –nothing like this had ever happened before.)  Yet, Jesus replied, “Let us go somewhere else—to the nearby villages—so I can preach there also. That is why I have come. (Mark 1: 37-38)
I imagine the disciples were a little surprised by that. Yet Jesus, in His time with His Father, knew what to do next. I’m sure people were disappointed in Him–He didn’t do what they wanted. But He is Jesus. His life is all about the Father’s will, body and soul, words and actions, connecting heaven and earth–all fueled by connection with God through prayer, and He invites us to do the same. Will we enter in?
–Luanne
Luanne wrote, “It is true that whatever we are doing with our physical bodies shows the priorities of our soul. Our inner life is reflected in our outward actions. If prayer becomes a priority, our lives will change…”
What we do with our physical bodies shows the priorities of our soul With the exception of cases of physical disability that can prevent us from doing with our bodies what our souls long to do, I absolutely agree with this statement. We make time and space in our lives to do the things our souls prioritize. Even in the midst of life’s responsibilities and demands, we find a way to do the things our souls desire. It’s how we’re wired. Sometimes the wiring gets crossed though–we’ll come back to that in a minute…
During his message, Pastor John mentioned that whether Jesus needed to or not, His getting up early to pray showed us what He wanted to do–where His heart and His priorities were. We know He was fully God as well as fully man. So we could argue that He didn’t NEED to go away to connect with God. We don’t know for sure how that all worked. But to me, seeing that it’s what he wanted to do, what he longed to do, speaks deeply to my heart and reminds me of my own longing. We come into existence with eternity set in our hearts (Ecclesiastes 3:11), and with an ache for “home” that we can’t really explain… In Jason Upton’s beautiful song, “Home to Me”, he articulates this ache a bit:
“…Before my lungs could breathe, I was alive in you;
Before my eyes were open, before my tongue could speak,
Before the bond was broken between you and me;
You were home to me…
You are where we all have come from,
You are where we long to go…”
Jason writes of a longing we all have, whether we’re aware of it or not. It’s the desire to live in the realm of the kingdom of the heavens, the kingdom Jesus brought to earth with Him–the kingdom that is absolutely available to us, if only we’ll make it a priority, like Jesus did, to plug into it. The last line of Upton’s song is,
“Let the way of Jesus lead us back where we belong.”
This is the opportunity we always have before us. The life of Jesus–His ways–will lead us where we belong, if we choose to follow Him. He showed us how to plug into the power source of His Kingdom. And it all begins with prayer. We are wired for it. But, like I mentioned above, sometimes our wiring gets crossed. We know that Jesus taught us to seek his Kingdom daily, to ask our Father for our daily bread… yet so often we settle for the bread of our yesterdays… And, I believe, this is what leads us to follow an idea of Jesus that is nothing like the real Jesus.
The concept of “daily bread” has cycled through my mind on repeat for about a week now…
I think we sometimes try to master the gift of daily provision. We try and hoard what we’ve been given today, and expect it to carry us into our tomorrows. We want our initial experience with Jesus to “cover” us, and to guarantee our eternity, without any further “plugging in” to His kingdom and His ways. We intuitively know that doing so will change us and our priorities–priorities that, along the way, have covered up our primal longing to connect with the Creator of our souls. But when we eat today’s bread tomorrow, and the next day, and on into the next month, year, decades, etc…, we end up eating stale, decomposing, bread. It makes us sick–and it leads us to follow a “Jesus” that doesn’t exist.
I’m not saying that the bread of yesterday was bad. It was what we needed then. It served it’s purpose for that day. It was intended to carry us to the next day, when we could again go to the source for that day’s bread. Bread doesn’t stay fresh for long. It molds, it rots, it gets stale, it decomposes. But Jesus is the bread of life, right? He won’t ever get stale or rotten, right? Right… IF we stay plugged into Him. But a taste of Jesus, a one-time experience of Jesus, in our imperfect human hands? That can absolutely “go bad” and decompose as the dirt of us mixes with the beauty of Him. This is where theologies that look nothing like His kingdom begin. We must go back to the source, daily, if we expect our relationship with God to stay fresh, and if we expect to grow into people who reflect the One we say we follow.
Luanne wrote, “I can honestly say that I am not who I used to be. God has changed me, and it has been through my time with Him. I don’t know how He’s done it, but I know that He has.” Coming to Jesus daily, knowing He is the daily bread we need, and seeking His kingdom first allows God to do His good work within us and change us in the way Luanne wrote about.
But eating old bread changes us, too. Plugging into our old understanding of Jesus, praying disconnected, formulaic prayers, doing religion for show–all of these are examples of what can happen when we try to make what we were given at first into what sustains us into eternity. We have to keep plugging into our Source. When we come to our God daily, hungry for the Bread of Life and thirsty for Living Water, we tap into the new wine of the kingdom of Jesus… We become familiar with His ways, and we begin to realize that His kingdom is exceedingly bigger and abundantly better than anything we’ve imagined. When this realization dawns on us, we stop trying to make today’s provision last into tomorrow, because we can’t wait for the fresh revelation tomorrow’s bread will bring. Continuing to return daily, remaining fixed in the presence of Jesus, will remind us of our own weakness and smallness as we encounter His power–the power of earth and heaven becoming one in His presence. We begin to see more and more of the heart of our God as we seek Him in prayer. Our own hearts expand, and so does our vision. We begin to see those around us, and we begin to see the stark contrast between the Kingdom of the heavens and the kingdoms of this world.
And… sometimes the presence we encounter in prayer is overwhelming. We know that choosing to follow this Kingdom path will lead us to rearrange our priorities, to be open to being changed at our core–and that can feel like too much. So we choose, sometimes, to choke down the rotting bread of yesterday and tells ourselves that’s good enough for this life. Our actions, words, and mindsets reveal the kind of bread we’re eating, as well as the priorities of our hearts. But we go on filling the ache for “home” with bread that, unbeknownst to us, is making us–and others–sick. Eating the old bread keeps us just full enough to check out, and allows us to mostly silence the cry of our souls for the bread of life that satisfies.
Eating the old bread doesn’t disqualify us from an eternity with Jesus–but it does render our present lives entirely useless for Kingdom purposes. It will keep us from experiencing the empowerment and freedom that only comes when we plug into the Kingdom. Plugging into the Kingdom happens when we follow the way of Jesus and connect with our God through prayer.
Have you been feasting on the maggoty bread of your yesterdays? Are you plugging into a source that has rewired your priorities? Take heart. There is fresh bread available for all of us. Is your heart not in it yet? Just move. Move toward God. He’s waiting for you. Ask Him for today’s bread. Let it carry you today. Then come back tomorrow and ask Him for that day’s bread. And the next day, and the next. The Bread of Life will fill you and heal the sickness of yesterday. And as you connect with “home”, your priorities will change. And you will change. There is no “right way” to pray, to connect with your Father. But Jesus did give us a model of where to begin. Let the way of Jesus lead us all back where we belong…
   Our Father in heaven,
        let Your name remain holy.
    Bring about Your kingdom.
    Manifest Your will here on earth,
        as it is manifest in heaven.
   Give us each day that day’s bread—no more, no less—
   And forgive us our debts
        as we forgive those who owe us something.
 Lead us not into temptation,
        but deliver us from evil.
(Matthew 6:9-13, VOICE)
–Laura
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Like Never Before #3: Authority

“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”  -Fr. Richard Rohr

Who is the authority over your life?

To answer this question, we have to first identify what “authority” is. Merriam-Webster’s first definition of the word is: power to influence or command thought, opinion, or behavior. We also understand it to generally mean the permission or ability to do something. Pastor John reminded us on Sunday that authority is typically inherited (as in a royal family), earned by experience (education, time on the job), or delegated/bestowed (political office).

Our passage this week was Mark 1:21-34. In verse 22, we read, regarding Jesus’ teaching in the temple:

 The people were amazed at his teaching, for he taught with real authority—quite unlike the teachers of religious law. (NLT)

Jesus came with a different kind of authority. His authority is inherent. This word means: existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic attribute. Jesus has authority simply because of who He is...

The people who heard Him teach recognized the other-worldly authority that immediately set Him apart–and it left them wide-eyed in amazement.

As Pastor John walked us through this passage, He identified three distinct facets of Jesus’ authority. He has intellectual authority, spiritual authority, and physical authority. His intellectual authority is what first amazed the people in His presence. We don’t know exactly what He said, and the actual words are not what matters in this case. The point was not what was said, but, rather, Who said it. It is this authority that calls us to repent–to change our minds and align our thinking with His.

Next, Jesus demonstrated spiritual authority, as He silenced and called out the evil that was present among them. It was no contest for Him–the evil recognized Jesus and His authority and, while it had no desire to leave, it had no choice. Jesus spoke briefly and pointedly–and it was done.

After Jesus finished teaching in the synagogue, they went to Simon’s (Peter’s) house, where his mother-in-law was sick with a fever. They told Jesus about her, and verse 31 tells us that …he went to her, took her hand and helped her up… The fever left her immediately, and she began to wait on them. Later that evening, the people in the town brought to Jesus everyone who was in need of healing, and we’re told that Jesus healed many of them. These healings demonstrated the physical authority of Jesus.

It is the physical authority of Jesus that we typically long for the most. We want Him to heal diseases, reconnect estranged family members, bring us breakthroughs financially, provide for our day-to-day, physical needs. We pray that He will fix what is broken around us–the things that we can see and touch. We know that He can–we’ve read the stories of miracles, and so we believe that He is able–so we ask Him to show up in these very tangible, physical ways in our lives.

And we largely ignore the other facets of His authority…

But, “…my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,” declares the Lord“As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts…” (Isaiah 55:8-9) 

Jesus’ order of things is almost always different than ours, because His desired outcome is not simply that our physical needs are met, and that we live happy and prosperous lives. He does meet our needs. He does heal. And there’s certainly nothing wrong with being happy or successful in theory… But the Kingdom that Jesus brought with Him into time and space is not primarily focused on these things. So, when our focus is set on the physical, we can find ourselves disappointed when Jesus doesn’t seem to meet our expectations.

I opened with this quote from Father Richard Rohr:

“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”

Jesus came to change our minds about God–to show us the perfect image of our previously invisible God, and to replace the lies we believed about who He is and the orientation of His heart toward humanity with the truth of who He really is. He came to show us how far Love would go for us… And He keeps coming to us. To rewrite the stories in our heads that have become “truth” to us. This is so important because, as Pastor John told us on Sunday, the beliefs we hold onto affect every part of us. What we believe in our minds–the stories that cycle through our thoughts–impacts us spiritually and physically. I don’t know about you, but I know this is true for me. A fearful thought, or a belief that I’ve been rejected by someone can wreak havoc in my mind. My focus is immediately on the fear or the rejection, and it pulls me away from the truth of who God is, and the truth of who He says I am. I become spiritually disconnected, and it begins to have physical effects. As my thoughts spiral, I feel the hurt and anger in my chest… My heart rate might speed up, I may cry, my outward reactions to the people around me can become strained and impatient. However it manifests, it absolutely affects me physically. And it all starts in my mind…

Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard wrote, “Our life always expresses the result of our dominant thoughts.” I have to agree with his assertion, and I believe it’s why Paul implores us in Colossians 3:2 to, “Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.

Our minds have incredible power to affect our lives, so this is where Jesus begins. He wants to change how we think, to teach us and empower us to follow Him. He desires that we focus on who He is--that we see Him rightly (which will always leave us amazed…) so that we can be free from the lies that dominate our thoughts–rather than on what He can do. But, as is always the case with our Jesus, He will not impose His authority on an unwilling mind. He himself states in Matthew 28:18, “…All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.” ALL authority. But He doesn’t control us with His authority. We all have to settle within ourselves who the authority in our lives is. To whom do we give the authority to teach us, speak into us, lead us, heal us? For some of us, fear is our authority. For others of us, we look to our nation or government as our ultimate authority. Maybe it’s a spouse, a leader, or maybe it’s just ourselves. But, be assured, all of us have set someone or something as the authority over our lives. It’s our job to identify who or what that is. 

Once we invite the authority of Jesus to transform our minds and change the way we think about Him, we are able to see His power manifest in the spiritual as well. So many of us have wrongly identified evil as the strongest force in our world and, in doing so, we’ve allowed fear to become our authority. Our fears become what we answer to–they get to dictate our moments and our days. When our beliefs have told us over and over again how strong the evil is and how much we have to fear, we lose sight of the truth that evil trembles in the Presence of our Jesus. We unknowingly begin to cooperate with evil more than we yield to the authority of our King. Once we allow Jesus to speak truth to our minds, so that we can begin to change the way we think, He can turn our beliefs about evil right-side up and silence our fears–He can and will call out the evil that has been making a home in our lives, and bring spiritual healing that we didn’t know to ask for.

Once our minds and our spirits are touched by the authority and power of Jesus, some of our physical “needs” will fall by the wayside. As our focus changes, the things we ask for begin to change, too. But still, very real physical needs remain. Sickness, poverty, broken relationships–these are realities in our world, and even when our eyes are focused on the face of Jesus, we long for His healing to flow to these places.

In our passage, we see Jesus’ physical authority in the way He deals with Simon’s mother-in-law and her fever. Mark 1:31 tells us that “…he went to her, took her hand and helped her up.” The sweetness of Jesus that is evidenced in these few words fills my heart, and my eyes… This One who fashioned galaxies, who with a single breath created life; this One in whom all authority in the heavens and on earth resides is so very personal and tender and with us–present in all of our moments. And this is simply His way… The way He came to Simon’s mother-in-law is the way He comes to you, and to me. Before anything else happens, there is the wonder of His coming… He is always coming to us. Always. We sang “Reckless Love” on Sunday. These are some of the words we sang…

“There’s no shadow You won’t light up, Mountain You won’t climb up
Coming after me
There’s no wall You won’t kick down, Lie You won’t tear down
Coming after me

Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God
Oh, it chases me down, fights ’til I’m found, leaves the ninety-nine
I couldn’t earn it, and I don’t deserve it, still, You give Yourself away…”

Jesus’ physical authority is not established because He always answers our prayers for healing the way that we want Him to–there are many instances I can recall from my own life where this hasn’t been the case. No, he does so much more than wave His hand and fix what’s wrong, what’s broken, what’s dying… He establishes His physical authority by way of His Presence. God with us comes to us, holds us, helps us, and brings us hope.

Sometimes the healing doesn’t come–but Jesus always does.

And He knows the answers to all of our “why?” questions. He knows the kind of healing we need most. He knows what those we love need most. We know He can do anything, and that He actually possesses the authority to do whatever we ask, so when He doesn’t heal or provide or restore the way we ask Him to, we wonder why. But if we have allowed His authority to reshape our minds, to repair our spirits and to reset our beliefs, we can say “It is well with my soul…” because we know Him. We will be able to see Him rightly and so we’ll know that He is always good, and always coming after us, to hold us and to help us His way. Pastor and author Brian Zahnd writes in his book, Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God, that he began to pray this prayer in the year 2000:

“God, I want to spend the rest of my life discovering you as you are revealed in Christ.”

That’s a prayer that invites the grandness of God to change our minds. It’s a prayer that invites the authority of Jesus to show us who our God really is–and that’s something we need more than we know…

And so, friends, I ask you even as I ask my own heart–

Is this Jesus the authority in your life? 

I pray we will all have the courage to dig deep, to listen, to let the higher thoughts and ways of Jesus change our minds where they need to be changed, so that we can see Him for who He truly is–the One who holds all authority in the heavens and on earth. He’s waiting for you and for me to invite Him in, so that He can do what only He can do.

–Laura

Laura asks us: Is this Jesus the authority in your life?  

If I answer that question honestly, my answer is most of the time I’m okay with that idea, but there are plenty of times that I want Jesus to yield to my way, even knowing that His ways are good and right–even if I don’t understand them. He is the source of His own authority, and whether I choose to live under His authority does not change the fact that He has it. If I introduce myself to someone, and tell them my name is Luanne, but they don’t believe that’s my name–it doesn’t change the fact that Luanne is my name. So it is with Jesus. He has authority over all things intellectual, spiritual, and physical. His authority has no bearing on my response to His authority. I’m the one who suffers if I choose my own way.

If you’ve read our blog for any length of time, you know that Laura and I both believe that all of scripture has to be interpreted through the lens of Jesus, We believe, from the bottom of our hearts, that what Paul says of Jesus in Colossians 1:15-18 is true:

 The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation.  For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy.
Read those verses through a few times. Read them slowly. Sit with them. Ponder the wonder, the mystery, the power, the authority that Jesus has. He is Lord. There is no other.
In highlighting his intellectual authority, I think of the Sermon on the Mount (Mt. 5-7). Jesus has told people that He did not come to abolish the law, but to fulfill it. He says, a number of times, you have heard it said–but I say to you...  
Over and over in His sermon, He uses this phrase. He has the authority to challenge the Pharisaic interpretation of the law, and He did just that. He turned it on its head-the common people loved it, the Pharisees, not so much.
I  read something recently that caused me to stop, re-read, and I’m still thinking about it, because I believe it to be true, and I believe it may be the reason that Evangelical Christians have a reputation in this country of being mean. The thought went something like this: We can’t use the voice of Moses to silence the voice of Christ. (Zahnd).  I would say that the same is true of the Apostle Paul’s voice, or any other voice. Christ is Supreme.
I believe we’ve used scripture to silence His voice many times, which has led us to looking and being less and less like Him, rather than more and more like Him. He is Lord. What He says is the final authority on all matters. That is why we have got to know Him. We’ve got to know His ways. We have got to spend time reading the gospels over, and over, and over, and over. Then, we interpret the rest of the written word through the lens of Jesus, the Living Word.  If something seems contradictory in scripture, go with Jesus! He has every right to challenge our cultural understanding of Christianity. Will we be teachable?
When He says to us “You have heard it said…”, or “Your church tradition taught”…”but I say to you…”  will we question His authority?  To be Christian means we look like Christ, we love like Christ, we serve like Christ, etc. He has invited us to be part of His mission, and His mission is fueled by the heart of God whose very nature is love.
“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”  -Fr. Richard Rohr
Jesus, the image of the invisible God, the demonstration of the love of God, the Prince of Peace, the Hope of the world is here, and He invites us to recognize and submit to His intellectual authority, His spiritual authority, and His physical authority over all things. He is kind. He is good. He does not use His authority to demean us, but to lift us up, to declare us righteous, to help us grow, to give us purpose and meaning, to teach us to live like Him and to love like Him, and to allow us to join Him in the mission of the only Kingdom worth serving.
–Luanne
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Like Never Before #2

We began a new series last week called “Like Never Before”. We looked at Jesus’ words in Mark 1:14-15 where He told us what God is all about. He let us know that the time had come, the Kingdom of God had arrived in the here and now; He encouraged us to repent (change our minds) and believe the Good News (gospel). God is here, His Kingdom is here, He has come near. Good news indeed!

After telling us Jesus’ message, the next thing that Mark tells us is how Jesus called His first disciples (vs 16-20). And, as is always the case with Jesus, it didn’t look the way one might have expected. We sometimes become so familiar with the accounts of Jesus in scripture that we forget how radical His ways were. One would think that God in the flesh would look for followers in the temple, or among those who were well versed in the Torah, but that wasn’t His way. Is it possible that He went elsewhere because often times the religious think they already know everything there is to know about the ways of God? Could it be because the religious have expectations of how God is supposed to act–how He’s supposed to relate to sinners? Could it be that the religious don’t want their belief system messed with?  Could it be that they are comfortable with it the way it is? Could it be that  the religious struggle to believe that everyone counts in God’s kingdom?These are definitely attitudes for us to think about and guard against in our own journeys of faith.

So, Jesus, in His unorthodox way of doing things, took a walk along the seashore where there were common fishermen and He called out to them. First to Simon (Peter) and his brother Andrew, then to John and his brother James. He invited them to come after Him and told them He would make them fishers of men.

Mark tells us that “at once” and “without delay” they dropped everything and followed Jesus. Stop and think for a moment how remarkable that whole scenario is. Jesus is inviting regular common laborers to join Him in His mission. They don’t have a clue what they are really getting themselves into, but they followed immediately. What does this tell us about the type of followers that Jesus is looking for?

Pastor John highlighted three things:

1. Trust. Jesus is looking for followers who will trust Him completely. He is looking for those who will go where He leads without having to know all the details. He is looking for those who will drop everything to be with Him and join Him in what He’s doing. Jesus says to these men in verse 17, “Come after me.”  

“Come after me” can be interpreted in two different ways: it can be the literal following–He goes ahead and we come after, or it can be intense pursuit. I think both are fitting.

Do we trust Him enough to go after Him with all that we have and all that we are wherever He leads?

We won’t do it perfectly. Peter was the first disciple called, and he denied Jesus a few years later. Even so,  Jesus didn’t leave Peter behind. He again went to Peter by the sea, fixed him breakfast, asked Peter if he loved him, and continued to invite Peter to be part of what He was doing.  Peter followed Jesus once again and was powerfully used by God after Jesus’ ascension. That should give all of us some hope. God is not after our perfection, but He is after our trust. Will we trust Him with our lives?

2. Teachable: Jesus says to Peter and Andrew–come follow me and I will teach you how to fish for people.  Jesus was telling them that he was going to teach them something new. He was going to turn them into something that they weren’t before. To be teachable, we must be willing to be changed. There is no growth without change. We have to be willing to let go of old positions, old understandings, old ways of thinking, and go with Jesus.

I think maybe this is one of the reasons that Jesus didn’t go to the religious. He went to men who had no religious baggage, and they were willing to let go of the familiar and learn something new. Again, I think there is much here for those of us who’ve been around church for awhile to think about. Jesus, later in His ministry, confronted the religious leaders and said to them: “You hypocrites! Isaiah was right when he prophesied about you, for he wrote, ‘These people honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me. Their worship is a farce, for they teach man-made ideas as commands from God.’ For you ignore God’s law and substitute your own tradition.” (Mark 7:6-8 NLT)

That’s not to say that Jesus didn’t love the religious community. He wept over Jerusalem because they had rejected Him and the peace He offered (Luke 19:41) —  they were not teachable.

Are we teachable? Are we willing to wrestle with our own traditions to see if they line up with the teachings of Jesus? Are we willing to wrestle with cultural Christianity and get to the heart of the true message of Christ–the real good news that He Himself preached,  and not what we’ve turned it into? Are we willing to let the Holy Spirit take us deeper? Are we teachable?

3. Task-oriented: Jesus told his first followers what their purpose would be. He was going to make them “fishers of men”. In the days when Jesus walked the earth, the fishermen did not use a hook and bait–they used nets. They knew when to throw them, how to throw them, and how to bring them back in. They didn’t fish alone; they worked together. Fishing was their livelihood. If they didn’t fish, they didn’t eat. Their lives were totally about fishing.

Most of the fishermen/women I know today  fish recreationally. They use a hook, they use a lure, they basically trick the fish, then get it caught by the mouth and reel it in. Pastor John pointed out that, unfortunately, that’s how much of the church “fishes” for people. We bait and hook people with guilt and shame, and I’ll add fear, then reel them in on that line–which is never the way of Jesus. Lots of the bait and hook “fish” don’t stick around for the long haul, or they don’t get past thinking that God is mean and angry with them, and therefore never encounter the love and freedom that He has for them or the joy that can be found in Him.

A net holds fish, it doesn’t hook fish. Are we casting a net that attracts people to the God who loves them, or are we fishing through condemnation?  Jesus was incredibly attractive to the outcasts of the day. He valued them and let them know they were loved, wanted, worth spending time with, treasured. He did not manipulate people into His Kingdom. He is not an “us and them” kind of Savior. Is this the Jesus we show to the world?  Do we model the real Jesus who got in trouble because of who He hung out with, or do we model  the Pharisaical religious community who judged the world and those they perceived as “sinners” harshly? Again–things to think about.

Ultimately, what is it that Jesus wants us to be about?  He wants us to be about exactly what He was about–letting people know that God is here, His Kingdom is here, He loves us–all of us, He has new life and new purpose to give to us.  Whatever we’ve thought about God in the past, Jesus tells us to change our minds about it (repent),  because He is here full of all embracing, totally unconditional love–it’s His very nature–and that’s good news. And then He invites us to join Him in sharing this good news with everybody everywhere.

This is our call:

Go in MY authority that I am giving to YOU and make more disciples. Show them who I AM so they will believe in ME, so they will follow MY words, MY teachings. Let those who choose to come after ME proclaim I am their Lord through baptism. And know this, there will never be a day that I AM NOT WITH YOU. (Mt. 28:19-20 paraphrase)

Jesus tells us to follow His teachings and teach His teachings to others. To be a disciple means to be a student. Are we students who know our Teacher well enough to know His teachings, to trust Him, to let Him continue to teach us, and to give our lives for the task that He’s laid out before us so that others can become His students, experience His love, and join us in making more disciples? This, my friends, is how the world will be changed–one precious person at a time.

–Luanne

As I listened to the message on Sunday, I couldn’t help but think back over my life, and my own personal journey with Jesus. I love that Jesus went to the unlikely, those on the outside, to invite them to be his closest followers and friends. I love that He did things his own way, that He was radical, and that He always showed up in unexpected places. But I haven’t always loved these things about Jesus…and I don’t always love these things, even now.
At certain points in my life, I’ve been the fisherman willing to drop everything and follow Jesus as a trusting, teachable, task-oriented disciple. I’ve also been the religious one in the temple–a know-it-all Christian with expectations of how God will show up. For me, this wasn’t a “before and after” thing. I can look back over my life and see seasons when I was in one camp, and seasons when I was in the other. I hate that about me…
Within my one self, I am capable of religious bigotry, and I know that I’ve lived a good many of my total days as a prideful, judgmental “Christian”. I know that I’m capable of drifting back to that space in any given moment, too, under certain circumstances. I wish that wasn’t true. But it is.
It’s also true that as an eight-year-old girl, I ran to Jesus with reckless abandon. I fell in love with the beauty that only One possesses long before I had any sense of what falling in love even was. In that season? I was a trusting, teachable follower, and all I wanted was more of Jesus. I had a fair amount of religious baggage already, and it would rear its ugly head down the road, but Jesus had my whole heart. He had pursued me, called me, and I wanted to follow Him wherever He would lead me.
I could cite example after example of the times I’ve been the arrogant, privileged, religious, put-God-in-a-box, “in the know” “Christian”, too. The list is long. In fact, just this morning the Holy Spirit convicted me about an area where I’ve been acting this way, an area where I need to repent–change my way of thinking so that it aligns with Jesus’ way of seeing the situation.
I could also cite many examples of times I’ve felt like the outsider, the one on the sidelines, the one whose presence doesn’t matter at all. These are the times I’ve felt unseen, unworthy, unqualified, and just plain unloved.
Do you know what is so beautiful about Jesus? He comes to both versions of me (and all the versions in between) and issues the same invitation every time. I’m so grateful this is true. This is what I couldn’t stop thinking about as I pondered this message… How, so often, I’m not trusting Him. I’m not very teachable. And I lose my focus on the task at hand. And yet, He comes. He pursues me and He chooses me-even when I’m in the “wrong” camp. I’ll never get over the love of Jesus, the grace and mercy He continually extends to the mess of me…
I completely agree that Jesus was looking for those who would allow Him to make them into a particular kind of follower–those who would trust, who would be teachable, and who would be task-oriented. The story clearly shows us that. I just believe, based on my experience of who Jesus is, that He chooses all of us. I believe his invitation was the same to everyone He encountered as He walked the earth. The story of Jesus includes many interactions between Jesus and the religious. He ate meals with them, engaged in conversations with them, and invited at least a handful to follow Him, though, sadly,  most did not. I believe there must have been many times that He extended the invitation, because Jesus doesn’t change. If He invites ALL now, He invited, or chose, ALL then, too. We know that many of the religious elite eventually put their faith in Him, and were leaders in the early church after Jesus’ resurrection and ascension. I’m certain that Jesus issued many invitations that didn’t make it into what we have come to know as Scripture, because not everything that happened was included. We know that. But because we know Jesus and we know that He came with a reckless, unchanging love and a desire to reconcile ALL people to Himself, we can safely assume that there was no one that He didn’t choose. None were worthy of being chosen. But He wanted all of them–and all of us–anyway.
I absolutely believe Jesus invited all–including the judgmental, arrogant, religious community–to follow Him. And that is good news for those of us who find ourselves in that camp today–or even just from time to time. He is always calling and pursuing. But as was the case for many in His day, sometimes we don’t hear the invitation for what it is. We have expectations of how Jesus will show up, what He will say, who He’ll consider worthy of His invitation. We choose to reject things that don’t line up with what we have come to believe is true, and in the process, we often reject Jesus Himself. We end up rejecting Him because we don’t recognize Him, and we’re unwilling to let Him “make us become” who we could be in His hands.
Our response to the invitation of Jesus is what reveals what’s in our hearts. Whether we find ourselves in a boat on the water or studying in the temple, the invitation is the same. We get to choose whether we want to follow or not. And when we choose to follow Him, we are trusting Him to cultivate the heart of a follower within us. It’s not something any of us innately possess that sets us apart from anyone else. It’s something Jesus grows within us as He makes us into people who are becoming more like Him. There is no formula to being chosen by Jesus. He’s already chosen all of us. He came to show us just how far Love will go, how much Love will sacrifice, and how the way of Love stands above all other ways of living life. And He’s invited all of us into that love as our new way of being in the world. As Luanne wrote above,
“He wants us to be about exactly what He was about–letting people know that God is here, His Kingdom is here, He loves us–all of us, He has new life and new purpose to give to us. Whatever we’ve thought about God in the past, Jesus tells us to change our minds about it (repent),  because He is here, full of all embracing, totally unconditional love–it’s His very nature–and that’s good news.”
Jesus is the good news. For all people. And He’s invited us to share that beautiful message with all people, everywhere. Will we leverage our lives, as He did, to make Him known? Will we live out the love of Jesus like never before?
–Laura
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Like Never Before-Week 1

The first Sunday after Christmas marked a turning point, a launching-type moment. You could sense it in the air at church, feel it as we worshiped together, and hear it in the words Pastor John spoke to us. I’ve felt the stirring of the Spirit within me and I know I’m not the only one. God is shaking things up–so it’s fitting that our new series will take us down an old path… but through new eyes and with a new vision.

Our new series will take us through a good portion of the book of Mark. Pastor John has titled it “Like Never Before”, and those words carry a dual meaning. We will look at the ministry of Jesus–how He came and lived like no one ever had before. And we will be invited into becoming like this One we follow–letting His life indwell and transform us–in ways that we never have before, as we follow His lead to become the Church that He has always desired that we be.

This is what the Eternal One says, the One who does the impossible, the One who makes a path through the sea, a smooth road through tumultuous waters, Eternal One: Don’t revel only in the past, or spend all your time recounting the victories of days gone by. Watch closely: I am preparing something new; it’s happening now, even as I speak, and you’re about to see it. I am preparing a way through the desert; Waters will flow where there had been none. (Isaiah 43:16, 18-19 VOICE)

I came across this paraphrase of these verses this morning, and it felt so appropriate to include it here. When Jesus came to us with skin on–Emmanuel, God with us–He ushered in the new. He came as the answer, the fulfillment to the old covenant and the King of this new way that we’ll hear Him speak of over and over and over again–the way of the kingdom. His kingdom.

This week’s passage took us into the middle of the first chapter of Mark:

After John was put in prison, Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. “The time has come,”he said. “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!” (Mark 1:14-15, NIV)

Before we launch into these two rich verses, I want to touch on the first thirteen verses of this book. The very first words of the book of Mark, according to the NIV, read like this: “The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God…” I want to note here–because we’ll come back to it later–that “good news” in this verse as well as in verse 14 above is translated from the Greek word “euaggelion”. This is the same word that is translated “gospel” at least 67 throughout what we call our new testament. Hang onto that and we’ll come back…

Mark 1: 2-8 chronicles the work of John the baptizer, the one who some thought was the Messiah, but who was actually the forerunner–the one who prepared the way for Jesus. Verses 9-11 record Jesus’ baptism by John, and verses 12 & 13 tell us of Jesus’ 40 days in the desert. Our series begins after that, as Jesus launches His ministry with bold, authoritative words. I included the NIV translation of these verses above; here is how J.B. Phillips says it:

It was after John’s arrest that Jesus came into Galilee, proclaiming the Gospel of God, saying, “The time has come at last—the kingdom of God has arrived. You must change your hearts and minds and believe the good news.” (J.B. Phillips)

Jesus came proclaiming the “gospel”, the “good news”. The good news of what? Himself. Look back at Mark 1:1. Mark wrote “…the beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah…” The good news was about Jesus.  What was it? Simply, He is here. Now. Messiah, God with us. The answer. The prophecy fulfilled. The King who had finally come to change everything and bring His kingdom to bear here, among us.

The “Gospel” was never meant to be a “sinner’s prayer”, a ticket to heaven or even, solely, our salvation. The Gospel, the good news, is: Jesus, the image of invisible God, God in the flesh came to us. He so loved us, valued us, desired relationship with us, that He came down into our grimy, broken existence to change everything. He, himself, IS salvation. To know Him is to experience salvation. But it doesn’t stop there–and that is what Pastor John brought to us on Sunday. Jesus absolutely saves us–no question about that. My life has been saved because I encountered this One who pursued me in my brokenness and won my heart with His extravagant love. But He does more than save us. He transforms us–from the inside out.

Mark 1:7-8 out of the Message paraphrase translates John the baptizer’s words like this:

As he [John] preached he said, “The real action comes next: The star in this drama, to whom I’m a mere stagehand, will change your life. I’m baptizing you here in the river, turning your old life in for a kingdom life. His baptism—a holy baptism by the Holy Spirit—will change you from the inside out.” (emphasis mine)

When Jesus says in verse 15, “Repent and believe the good news!”, He is not saying, as we’ve so often been told, “Stop sinning and say the sinner’s prayer so you don’t go to hell!” No. He is inviting us into the process of transformation. As we study and search the record of Jesus’ earthly ministry, we’ll find many things, many different ways of doing things, and much that challenges us to do the seemingly impossible. What we won’t find anywhere in the story of His life on earth is Him offering a one-time salvation experience that stops with that moment. He wasn’t satisfied with a statement of belief that went nowhere. He wasn’t looking for the masses to declare that they’d accepted Him as Lord on the temple steps and then go home to return to life as usual. There are many mentions of the word “salvation” in various forms in our new testament, but most of those occurrences were post-resurrection, and not said by Jesus. In fact, if you read the words of Jesus, you’ll find that He speaks of “salvation” very few times. What He can’t stop talking about is the kingdom.

What is the kingdom? We could try to define it many different ways, and they would all probably be part of the whole picture. But the original Greek word is defined like this:

royal power, kingship, dominion, rule; not to be confused with an actual kingdom but rather the right or authority to rule over a kingdom–the royal power of Jesus as the triumphant Messiah

This is the kingdom Jesus speaks of in Mark chapter 1… His authority as God, His right to rule, and the power to do so. And He will spend the rest of His time on earth showing us what that kingdom looks like, and how it operates. And it’s like nothing anyone had seen before. His is an altogether different kingdom, unlike any that came before or any that would come after.

We’ll see the picture of this kingdom develop as our series continues. For now, in this week’s passage, Jesus tells us that this kingdom is “at hand”. I could jump up and down over what these words mean in the Greek!!! The word translated “at hand” is “eggizo“. It means, “to bring near, to join one thing to another“. It comes from the root word “eggys”, which means, “near: of place, position, and time”. And the root word of this word means, “to squeeze”.

So, if you’ll allow me to take a little bit of creative liberty, we could put it together like this:

“The kingdom, the triumphant rule of Jesus our Messiah, has been brought near. So near, in fact, that it has squeezed into our place, position and time to join together what had been previously separated–that is, the heavens and the earth.”

Jesus came as fully God and fully man, as one born of both heaven and earth, that the two realms might be joined together under His Lordship. “To join one thing to another” is used elsewhere in scripture to describe the union between husband and wife. It is an intimate oneness. This is the language Jesus used to talk about this kingdom that is now available to us through Him.

But He said something else right before he spoke this declaration about the Kingdom. He said, “Repent.” Earlier, I included the J.B. Phillips translation of our key verses. The word “repent” shows up differently in this translation. These are the words used in place of “repent”: “change your hearts and minds”. This is actually a far more accurate translation of what Jesus was saying than what we have come to understand the word repent to mean. To repent is to change the way we think. This is what Jesus was offering to His listeners in these verses. An invitation to change the way they thought about Him, about the prophecies of old and their expectations of how they would be fulfilled, and about what this new kingdom would look like.

Jesus is offering us the same invitation today…

Many of us have gotten stuck somewhere on our journey. Maybe we said the sinner’s prayer and stopped there. Maybe we learned a little and grew to a point, but life got in the way. Whatever our individual stories may be, we are all invited to change the way we think, to let Jesus transform our minds and grow us like never before. Transformation is always a product of the renewal of our minds. And it is essential to our becoming kingdom people who actually are growing into the image of the Jesus we follow…

William Paul Young writes in the Foreword to the book Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God,

“If transformation is by the renewal of the mind and I have never changed my mind, then be assured I am actively resisting the work of the Holy Spirit in my life. Everyone who grows, changes. But it is hard work to change, to be open, to take the risk of trust. Change always involves death and resurrection, and both are uncomfortable. Death because it involves letting go of old ways of seeing, of abandoning sometimes precious prejudices. It means having to ask for forgiveness and humble ourselves. And resurrection is no easy process either; having to take risks of trust that were not required when everything seemed certain, agreeing with the new ways of seeing while not obliterating the people around you, some who told you what they thought was true but isn’t after all. Transformation is not easy; ask any butterfly.”

Transformation is not easy, that much is certainly true. But it is essential to our growth, to our learning to thrive, and to our becoming the people–and the Church–that actually look like the Jesus we say we follow. Transformation is at least as important as our initial salvation experience, if not more so–because transformation is the process in which we are joined so intimately with our King that his kingdom is conceived in and then born through us.

Church, are we willing to do things in a new way, in a way like never before, so that the world around us might see the Jesus that they’ve never been able to see before?

–Laura

I am very excited about this series, and I’m also very aware that those of us who know the stories of Christ can have a tendency to glaze over a bit and sit back comfortably thinking we’ve heard it before. We rob ourselves of the opportunity to be “wowed”, to let the Holy Spirit teach us something new, to be awestruck and further transformed into the likeness of Jesus.  I agree with Laura–we can all get a little stuck. Our Christianity becomes formulaic, it becomes about church attendance and Bible study, so, I too want to reiterate that  Christianity is about transformation (personal, corporate, societal etc.)–a beautiful process that will continue as long as we’re on planet earth, if we’ll let it.

I imagine most of you will agree with me, that these are difficult days in our nation. We are divided, polarized, angry, and hateful. Unfortunately, the church, primarily the white evangelical church is right in the middle of the “ugly”.  How did this happen? I think Brian McLaren is right when he says we reflect the image of the God we believe in. Who is God? What is He like? How does He treat you? How does He treat the people you don’t care for? Does He have favorites? Is He loving? Is He angry? Is He kind? Is He mean?

Your answers to these questions, and many others like them, will reveal what you believe about God. The question then becomes are you believing in the God who is fully revealed in Jesus. Does your view of God look like Jesus?  Because if you have seen the Son, you have seen the Father (John 14:9). Jesus is the image of the invisible God. (Col. 1:15) Does your God look like Jesus? Does your reflection of God look like Jesus? Is the image of God in you the image of Jesus? It’s key that we get this right.

As we head into this series “Like Never Before”,  let’s pay close attention to the God revealed in Jesus, beginning with Jesus’ words in Mark 1.

After John was put in prison, Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. “The time has come,”he said. “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!” (Mark 1:14-15, NIV)

The time has come...  God designed that planet earth would be governed by time. We all understand our lives in terms of seconds, minutes, hours, days, months, years. God, who knows what He’s doing,  has designated times and seasons with specific purposes in mind. In the scriptural accounts of Jesus, we see many references to the time had come, or the time had not yet come…etc.  In Luke 2, we read about the birth of Christ and the time came for Mary to give birth. In her case, it meant that the months of pregnancy– of waiting –were over. She was going to get to see the face of her sweet baby, the face of God.  Jesus was ready to be born–it was time. God’s ordained time.

When Jesus proclaims “The time has come”…He is saying your long season of waiting is over. This is the birth of a new thing. I am going to show you the very face of God. All of time has been pointing to this moment. You will see His face in me. You will get to know Him in me. You will experience His heart in me. He will be fully revealed in me. THE time where everything changes forever has come. This simple statement is huge. Jesus is announcing a world altering event. Huge.

The kingdom of God has come near...I like the translations that say, The kingdom of God is at hand…. I like that because “near” can still be distant. I live near my place of work, but I drive to get there. At hand signifies I can reach out and grasp it right now. I currently have notebooks, pens, a throw pillow, my phone, my computer, lots of books, a lamp, and some Kleenex “at hand”.  The kingdom of God is at hand. It is readily available. You can reach out right where you are and grasp it. The dominion of God is here, available to you.

Jesus taught us to pray may your Kingdom come and your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. (Mt. 6:10), giving us the key as to what it looks like for His “at hand” Kingdom to be present here. When God’s will is being done, His Kingdom is here. I’m almost afraid to write that because His will has been interpreted so many different ways and many atrocities have happened/are happening in His name.  That’s why it is imperative that we know Jesus, the full revelation of God, who makes the ways and will of God very clear. Pastor John broke it down into very simple terms in our first service when he told us that  to pray “your Kingdom come” means that we want God’s love, grace, and mercy here, on planet earth--and I’ll add that it’s for everyone. We want God’s love, grace and mercy here, for everyone.

Repent. Laura wrote above that “repent” means to change your mind. It is the Greek word metanoia– which literally means to change one’s mind, a transformative change of heart, a conversion. Think about the process of the butterfly that Laura wrote about above…it goes through meta-morphasis. Total change. The Oxford dictionary says that the word conversion is “The process of changing or causing something to change from one form to another. ‘the conversion of food into body tissues'”.    

The Apostle Paul tells us in Romans 12:2 Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is–his good, pleasing and perfect will.  The NLT version translates the phrase “renewing of your mind” to “by changing the way you think”.   And the result of not following the world’s ways by thinking a new way is that we’ll know God’s will–the ways of His Kingdom, His dominion, His reign–and we will be transformed and transforming into something new.

Believe the good news: What good news? Everything that Jesus has just said. Believe that the time is here, God’s Kingdom is here, you can be part of it–

You can be part of it. This is good news. In that day, the religious elite kept everyone else out. According to them, unless you looked like them, acted like them, had their education, were their gender (male), were part of their ethnic group, you were out. And they put all kind of demands on the “commoners” who wanted to be close to God, making it impossible, in their system, to be close. Jesus said—those days are over. God has come to you–the commoners. God loves you…you who think you’re not worthy of God’s love. He loves you. You who have been told you’re unclean–He loves you. You who have nothing to offer–He loves you. You who have made horrible choices and have tremendous regrets–He loves you. You who don’t really want anything to do with Him–He loves you.

Believe the good news–the gospel—the kingdom of God is here and Jesus is what God looks like. The time has come. Believe Him and then join Him in bringing His love, His grace, His mercy here…everywhere to everyone.

–Luanne

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