Like Never Before #3: Authority

“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”  -Fr. Richard Rohr

Who is the authority over your life?

To answer this question, we have to first identify what “authority” is. Merriam-Webster’s first definition of the word is: power to influence or command thought, opinion, or behavior. We also understand it to generally mean the permission or ability to do something. Pastor John reminded us on Sunday that authority is typically inherited (as in a royal family), earned by experience (education, time on the job), or delegated/bestowed (political office).

Our passage this week was Mark 1:21-34. In verse 22, we read, regarding Jesus’ teaching in the temple:

 The people were amazed at his teaching, for he taught with real authority—quite unlike the teachers of religious law. (NLT)

Jesus came with a different kind of authority. His authority is inherent. This word means: existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic attribute. Jesus has authority simply because of who He is...

The people who heard Him teach recognized the other-worldly authority that immediately set Him apart–and it left them wide-eyed in amazement.

As Pastor John walked us through this passage, He identified three distinct facets of Jesus’ authority. He has intellectual authority, spiritual authority, and physical authority. His intellectual authority is what first amazed the people in His presence. We don’t know exactly what He said, and the actual words are not what matters in this case. The point was not what was said, but, rather, Who said it. It is this authority that calls us to repent–to change our minds and align our thinking with His.

Next, Jesus demonstrated spiritual authority, as He silenced and called out the evil that was present among them. It was no contest for Him–the evil recognized Jesus and His authority and, while it had no desire to leave, it had no choice. Jesus spoke briefly and pointedly–and it was done.

After Jesus finished teaching in the synagogue, they went to Simon’s (Peter’s) house, where his mother-in-law was sick with a fever. They told Jesus about her, and verse 31 tells us that …he went to her, took her hand and helped her up… The fever left her immediately, and she began to wait on them. Later that evening, the people in the town brought to Jesus everyone who was in need of healing, and we’re told that Jesus healed many of them. These healings demonstrated the physical authority of Jesus.

It is the physical authority of Jesus that we typically long for the most. We want Him to heal diseases, reconnect estranged family members, bring us breakthroughs financially, provide for our day-to-day, physical needs. We pray that He will fix what is broken around us–the things that we can see and touch. We know that He can–we’ve read the stories of miracles, and so we believe that He is able–so we ask Him to show up in these very tangible, physical ways in our lives.

And we largely ignore the other facets of His authority…

But, “…my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,” declares the Lord“As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts…” (Isaiah 55:8-9) 

Jesus’ order of things is almost always different than ours, because His desired outcome is not simply that our physical needs are met, and that we live happy and prosperous lives. He does meet our needs. He does heal. And there’s certainly nothing wrong with being happy or successful in theory… But the Kingdom that Jesus brought with Him into time and space is not primarily focused on these things. So, when our focus is set on the physical, we can find ourselves disappointed when Jesus doesn’t seem to meet our expectations.

I opened with this quote from Father Richard Rohr:

“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”

Jesus came to change our minds about God–to show us the perfect image of our previously invisible God, and to replace the lies we believed about who He is and the orientation of His heart toward humanity with the truth of who He really is. He came to show us how far Love would go for us… And He keeps coming to us. To rewrite the stories in our heads that have become “truth” to us. This is so important because, as Pastor John told us on Sunday, the beliefs we hold onto affect every part of us. What we believe in our minds–the stories that cycle through our thoughts–impacts us spiritually and physically. I don’t know about you, but I know this is true for me. A fearful thought, or a belief that I’ve been rejected by someone can wreak havoc in my mind. My focus is immediately on the fear or the rejection, and it pulls me away from the truth of who God is, and the truth of who He says I am. I become spiritually disconnected, and it begins to have physical effects. As my thoughts spiral, I feel the hurt and anger in my chest… My heart rate might speed up, I may cry, my outward reactions to the people around me can become strained and impatient. However it manifests, it absolutely affects me physically. And it all starts in my mind…

Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard wrote, “Our life always expresses the result of our dominant thoughts.” I have to agree with his assertion, and I believe it’s why Paul implores us in Colossians 3:2 to, “Set your minds on things above, not on earthly things.

Our minds have incredible power to affect our lives, so this is where Jesus begins. He wants to change how we think, to teach us and empower us to follow Him. He desires that we focus on who He is--that we see Him rightly (which will always leave us amazed…) so that we can be free from the lies that dominate our thoughts–rather than on what He can do. But, as is always the case with our Jesus, He will not impose His authority on an unwilling mind. He himself states in Matthew 28:18, “…All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.” ALL authority. But He doesn’t control us with His authority. We all have to settle within ourselves who the authority in our lives is. To whom do we give the authority to teach us, speak into us, lead us, heal us? For some of us, fear is our authority. For others of us, we look to our nation or government as our ultimate authority. Maybe it’s a spouse, a leader, or maybe it’s just ourselves. But, be assured, all of us have set someone or something as the authority over our lives. It’s our job to identify who or what that is. 

Once we invite the authority of Jesus to transform our minds and change the way we think about Him, we are able to see His power manifest in the spiritual as well. So many of us have wrongly identified evil as the strongest force in our world and, in doing so, we’ve allowed fear to become our authority. Our fears become what we answer to–they get to dictate our moments and our days. When our beliefs have told us over and over again how strong the evil is and how much we have to fear, we lose sight of the truth that evil trembles in the Presence of our Jesus. We unknowingly begin to cooperate with evil more than we yield to the authority of our King. Once we allow Jesus to speak truth to our minds, so that we can begin to change the way we think, He can turn our beliefs about evil right-side up and silence our fears–He can and will call out the evil that has been making a home in our lives, and bring spiritual healing that we didn’t know to ask for.

Once our minds and our spirits are touched by the authority and power of Jesus, some of our physical “needs” will fall by the wayside. As our focus changes, the things we ask for begin to change, too. But still, very real physical needs remain. Sickness, poverty, broken relationships–these are realities in our world, and even when our eyes are focused on the face of Jesus, we long for His healing to flow to these places.

In our passage, we see Jesus’ physical authority in the way He deals with Simon’s mother-in-law and her fever. Mark 1:31 tells us that “…he went to her, took her hand and helped her up.” The sweetness of Jesus that is evidenced in these few words fills my heart, and my eyes… This One who fashioned galaxies, who with a single breath created life; this One in whom all authority in the heavens and on earth resides is so very personal and tender and with us–present in all of our moments. And this is simply His way… The way He came to Simon’s mother-in-law is the way He comes to you, and to me. Before anything else happens, there is the wonder of His coming… He is always coming to us. Always. We sang “Reckless Love” on Sunday. These are some of the words we sang…

“There’s no shadow You won’t light up, Mountain You won’t climb up
Coming after me
There’s no wall You won’t kick down, Lie You won’t tear down
Coming after me

Oh, the overwhelming, never-ending, reckless love of God
Oh, it chases me down, fights ’til I’m found, leaves the ninety-nine
I couldn’t earn it, and I don’t deserve it, still, You give Yourself away…”

Jesus’ physical authority is not established because He always answers our prayers for healing the way that we want Him to–there are many instances I can recall from my own life where this hasn’t been the case. No, he does so much more than wave His hand and fix what’s wrong, what’s broken, what’s dying… He establishes His physical authority by way of His Presence. God with us comes to us, holds us, helps us, and brings us hope.

Sometimes the healing doesn’t come–but Jesus always does.

And He knows the answers to all of our “why?” questions. He knows the kind of healing we need most. He knows what those we love need most. We know He can do anything, and that He actually possesses the authority to do whatever we ask, so when He doesn’t heal or provide or restore the way we ask Him to, we wonder why. But if we have allowed His authority to reshape our minds, to repair our spirits and to reset our beliefs, we can say “It is well with my soul…” because we know Him. We will be able to see Him rightly and so we’ll know that He is always good, and always coming after us, to hold us and to help us His way. Pastor and author Brian Zahnd writes in his book, Sinners in the Hands of a Loving God, that he began to pray this prayer in the year 2000:

“God, I want to spend the rest of my life discovering you as you are revealed in Christ.”

That’s a prayer that invites the grandness of God to change our minds. It’s a prayer that invites the authority of Jesus to show us who our God really is–and that’s something we need more than we know…

And so, friends, I ask you even as I ask my own heart–

Is this Jesus the authority in your life? 

I pray we will all have the courage to dig deep, to listen, to let the higher thoughts and ways of Jesus change our minds where they need to be changed, so that we can see Him for who He truly is–the One who holds all authority in the heavens and on earth. He’s waiting for you and for me to invite Him in, so that He can do what only He can do.

–Laura

Laura asks us: Is this Jesus the authority in your life?  

If I answer that question honestly, my answer is most of the time I’m okay with that idea, but there are plenty of times that I want Jesus to yield to my way, even knowing that His ways are good and right–even if I don’t understand them. He is the source of His own authority, and whether I choose to live under His authority does not change the fact that He has it. If I introduce myself to someone, and tell them my name is Luanne, but they don’t believe that’s my name–it doesn’t change the fact that Luanne is my name. So it is with Jesus. He has authority over all things intellectual, spiritual, and physical. His authority has no bearing on my response to His authority. I’m the one who suffers if I choose my own way.

If you’ve read our blog for any length of time, you know that Laura and I both believe that all of scripture has to be interpreted through the lens of Jesus, We believe, from the bottom of our hearts, that what Paul says of Jesus in Colossians 1:15-18 is true:

 The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation.  For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him. He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. And he is the head of the body, the church; he is the beginning and the firstborn from among the dead, so that in everything he might have the supremacy.
Read those verses through a few times. Read them slowly. Sit with them. Ponder the wonder, the mystery, the power, the authority that Jesus has. He is Lord. There is no other.
In highlighting his intellectual authority, I think of the Sermon on the Mount (Mt. 5-7). Jesus has told people that He did not come to abolish the law, but to fulfill it. He says, a number of times, you have heard it said–but I say to you...  
Over and over in His sermon, He uses this phrase. He has the authority to challenge the Pharisaic interpretation of the law, and He did just that. He turned it on its head-the common people loved it, the Pharisees, not so much.
I  read something recently that caused me to stop, re-read, and I’m still thinking about it, because I believe it to be true, and I believe it may be the reason that Evangelical Christians have a reputation in this country of being mean. The thought went something like this: We can’t use the voice of Moses to silence the voice of Christ. (Zahnd).  I would say that the same is true of the Apostle Paul’s voice, or any other voice. Christ is Supreme.
I believe we’ve used scripture to silence His voice many times, which has led us to looking and being less and less like Him, rather than more and more like Him. He is Lord. What He says is the final authority on all matters. That is why we have got to know Him. We’ve got to know His ways. We have got to spend time reading the gospels over, and over, and over, and over. Then, we interpret the rest of the written word through the lens of Jesus, the Living Word.  If something seems contradictory in scripture, go with Jesus! He has every right to challenge our cultural understanding of Christianity. Will we be teachable?
When He says to us “You have heard it said…”, or “Your church tradition taught”…”but I say to you…”  will we question His authority?  To be Christian means we look like Christ, we love like Christ, we serve like Christ, etc. He has invited us to be part of His mission, and His mission is fueled by the heart of God whose very nature is love.
“Jesus didn’t come to change God’s mind about us. Jesus came to change our minds about God.”  -Fr. Richard Rohr
Jesus, the image of the invisible God, the demonstration of the love of God, the Prince of Peace, the Hope of the world is here, and He invites us to recognize and submit to His intellectual authority, His spiritual authority, and His physical authority over all things. He is kind. He is good. He does not use His authority to demean us, but to lift us up, to declare us righteous, to help us grow, to give us purpose and meaning, to teach us to live like Him and to love like Him, and to allow us to join Him in the mission of the only Kingdom worth serving.
–Luanne
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