The Lord’s Prayer #3

We will begin this week where we left off last week…

“Are you tired? Worn out? Burned out on religion? Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life. I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me—watch how I do it. Learn the unforced rhythms of grace. I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly.” 

(Matthew 11:28-30)

Pastor Beau started Sunday’s sermon with the same verses I closed out my portion of last week’s blog. As he prepared to preach, he didn’t have any idea what Luanne or I were writing about–yet, God was already leading him to connect the same dots. I love it when that happens! He read us these verses out of Matthew 11, and then shared with us a brief summary of Matthew 1-6. He reminded us of what Pastor John has taught us to this point from the sermon on the mount, highlighting the many places Jesus invites us to think differently, to see things a new way, to prepare our hearts to encounter his kingdom. (The last few blog posts include summaries if you’d like to revisit the material we have been learning.)

Beau challenged us to, once again, set aside what we have become familiar with and be willing to let God teach us something new. He emphasized the importance of coming to familiar passages–like The Lord’s Prayer–with open hearts and minds. He reminded us that, throughout the entire sermon on the mount, Jesus is introducing an upside-down kingdom. This now-familiar prayer is no exception.

He read us the prayer, and then explained it in a similar way to how I wrote about it last week. His focus was on how each line connects us to Jesus. When he finished walking us through the lines of the prayer, he said,

“The Lord’s Prayer is a moment to pause, to breathe… Trying too hard to check boxes off a list becomes overwhelming. We forget that we’re asking God for Jesus in this prayer.”

He then took us back to Matthew 11, only this time he read it from a different translation:

Then Jesus said, “Come to me, all of you who are weary and carry heavy burdens, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you. Let me teach you, because I am humble and gentle at heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy to bear, and the burden I give you is light.”

(Matthew 11:28-30, NLT, emphasis mine)

I highlighted the word yoke because what Beau shared with us about this word blew my mind on Sunday… When we think of this word, what generally comes to mind? The wooden piece of equipment placed on the backs of oxen so they can pull a plow, right? I’ve heard plenty of beautiful, informative sermon illustrations that employ this interpretation of the word. But what Pastor Beau shared was brand new to me.

Apparently, in ancient Judaism, the teachings of a rabbi were considered his “yoke.” Each rabbi’s yoke was different, as it contained his own subset of rules and interpretations. Jesus says here that his yoke is different from all the others. His teachings, he said, were easy, light, not burdensome or hard to bear. He asks his followers to take his teaching upon them and learn from him, to watch how he does it. And he says that in doing so, we’ll find rest for our souls.

Yes, I audibly gasped as I listened to this new teaching about one of my favorite passages of scripture. And it makes so much sense.

In The Lord’s Prayer, we are asking God to daily--every day and forever–give us Jesus. We are declaring our understanding that God’s kingdom came–and comes, still–through Jesus, that the will of God is displayed in Jesus, as he perfectly shows us how to love God with all that we are and how to love all others as ourselves. We are asking for the broken bread and living water that satisfies our souls. We are expressing our need to be led by the one who modeled and continues to teach us what forgiveness looks like.

In the Lord’s Prayer, we are asking for the yoke of our rabbi. And we are guaranteed that in that yoke, in the set of teachings we desire to model our lives after, we will find rest for our souls. I will never get over the beauty of our Jesus, the kindness of our God, the fresh revelation of the Spirit that leads us beyond our own understanding.

Pastor Beau asked us to breathe in Jesus, so that we could exhale Jesus into the world. He asked us to consider what burdens we are carrying, and then he shared that during this season of unknowns there has been a song that has ministered deeply to his heart. He paused in his sermon to share it with all of us. Here are the words:

I’m caught up in Your presence
I just want to sit here at Your feet
I’m caught up in this holy moment
I never want to leave

Oh, I’m not here for blessings
Jesus, You don’t owe me anything
More than anything that You can do
I just want You

Oh, I’m sorry when I’ve just gone through the motions
I’m sorry Lord when I just sang another song
Take me back to where we started
I open up my heart to You

I’m sorry when I’ve come with my agenda
I’m sorry when I forgot that You’re enough
Take me back to where we started
I open up my heart to You

Take me back, take me back, take me back to my first love…

I just want you
Nothing else, nothing else
Nothing else will do

I’m caught up in Your presence
I just want to sit here at Your feet
I’m caught up in this holy moment
I never want to leave

Oh, I’m not here for blessings
Jesus, You don’t owe me anything
More than anything that You can do
I just want You

“Nothing Else” by Donzell Taggart–

As I listened to this beautiful song, the words, “I’m caught up in Your presence, I just want to sit here at Your feet…” grabbed my attention. I couldn’t help but think of Mary, sitting at the feet of Jesus while her sister Martha worked away in the kitchen. Luke 10: 38-39 tells us:

As Jesus and the disciples continued on their way to Jerusalem, they came to a certain village where a woman named Martha welcomed him into her home. Her sister, Mary, sat at the Lord’s feet, listening to what he taught. 

(NLT, emphasis mine)

Mary sat at Jesus’ feet, soaking in his presence–taking on the yoke of her rabbi… We don’t have time here to go into all the reasons this scene was such an affront to the culture of that day, but it was so significant. It is also a beautiful illustration of what Pastor Beau taught us on Sunday.

The yoke of Jesus–his ways, teachings, leadership–is unlike any other yoke. We may carry many yokes–volumes of teachings, full of rules and expectations that don’t fit and are burdensome and heavy to carry–but we need only carry one.

Jesus teaches us to pray a prayer through which we ask God daily for Jesus. And when we ask for Him, when we position ourselves at his feet soaking in his presence, he shares with us his way. He carries his yoke with us so we can watch how he does it–all of “it”, and learn from him. Our souls long for this yoke, to be still and breathe in the Holy rest Jesus offers us. He is our daily bread, all that we need, and he longs to fill us with himself.

As I close this week, I find myself praying the same words I prayed last week:

My prayer for us is that we are formed and transformed as this prayer that Jesus gifted us becomes part of our daily lives–as He, himself is woven deeper and deeper into the core of who we are…

–Laura

Matthew 11:28-30 - I Will Give You Rest - Free Art Download ...

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