This I Know: Love the Story

I love to tell the story of unseen things above,
of Jesus and his glory, of Jesus and his love.
I love to tell the story, because I know ’tis true;
it satisfies my longings as nothing else could do.

I love to tell the story; ’twill be my theme in glory
                                         to tell the old, old story of Jesus and his love.                                              Author Kate Hankey

Pastor Diane, our children’s pastor, began her sermon on Sunday with the words of this old hymn. The message she brought reminded us to fall in love with God’s story and teach it to our children. She used the same scripture from Deuteronomy 6:4-9 that we wrote about a couple of weeks ago, so I will not expound on them again, but as a reminder those verses say:

“Listen, O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord alone. And you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, and all your strength.  And you must commit yourselves wholeheartedly to these commands that I am giving you today. Repeat them again and again to your children. Talk about them when you are at home and when you are on the road, when you are going to bed and when you are getting up. Tie them to your hands and wear them on your forehead as reminders. Write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates. (NLT)

Pastor Diane reminded us that the Israelites didn’t do this right all the time, and by the time we get to the book of Judges, chapter 2, an entire generation of Israelites were born who did not know the Lord and the mighty things he had done on behalf of Israel.  Somehow, the story didn’t get passed to the next generation.

We have written before about the importance of loving God and living out His love in front of others. So let’s talk story. God is writing a story–the theme is his love for all of us. Each of us are written into the story. Whether we accept him or reject him, his love for us remains constant. He is the author of the story. His love never fails.

When God put on flesh and came to earth as Jesus, the method he used to teach us about God’s kingdom and God’s ways were through story. Those stories were included in the stories written by Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. Story is a powerful method of communication. A good story is hard to forget. A good parable, or a good analogy that connects one thing to another is hard to forget.

The old hymn above says I love to tell the story…of Jesus and his love. Do we? And if so, what story are we telling? Is it personal? Is it dynamic? Do we bring our full, vulnerable, broken, forgiven, loved selves to the story? Is our story bathed in love?

The “old, old story of Jesus and his love” is not stale. Nothing about the living God ever grows stagnant. The old, old story is flowing fresh today–new stories, new encounters, all of which remind us of Jesus and his love, and they are happening in and around us all the time.

In the summer of 2011, my life was in crisis. At that time, I was unaware of how deep the crisis was–I only knew that something felt off in my being. I couldn’t put my finger on it–I just knew that something was horribly wrong. I was sitting in my backyard praying when a swallowtail butterfly flew straight to me–it could have landed on my nose–and as the butterfly came-so did these words “I see you. You are not alone.”  For the rest of that summer, every swallowtail sighting-and there were some significant ones–came with the message, “I see you. You are not alone.”  

When my life as I knew it exploded in November of that same year, the message of the butterfly kept me going. Because I had shared my butterfly story beforehand with my sister, she reminded me in my storm of Hagar who was in a desperate situation, and God showed up. Genesis 16:13 tells us, She gave this name to the LORD who spoke to her: “You are the God who sees me,” for she said, “I have now seen the One who sees me.”  

The Message version of the Bible writes that verse like this:

She answered God by name, praying to the God who spoke to her, “You’re the God who sees me!  “Yes! He saw me; and then I saw him!”

I have shared that butterfly encounter with many people. It is part of my story. Last Friday I was sitting in the backyard with my daughter and her little ones. A swallowtail flew into the backyard (the second one I’ve seen this season), and landed on a lilac blossom right in front of us. As I always do with swallowtail sightings, I got excited. My three year old granddaughter studied the butterfly, but also studied me. My daughter explained to her that sometimes God speaks to us through his creation, and that God had spoken to me through a swallowtail, so they always remind me of God.  My granddaughter is too young to need to know the details of that story and the circumstances surrounding it–but what she knows today is that God spoke to her “Lulu” through that butterfly. She knows that God reminds Lulu of his presence and promise every time a swallowtail appears, and that’s enough for today.  As she grows older, the story can become more complete, and my hope is that as long as she lives, when she sees a swallowtail she will remember that God speaks, and that he reminds us that he sees us, he loves us, and he is with us.

My current God story is not even all settled in my heart and mind yet–I’m still very much in it–but what I know is that God has been teaching me a great deal these last few months through a marginalized people group. Because of a life event, I ended up immersed in this culture by accident and prayed often about what God’s purpose in that was. His answer was–love people. Love them sincerely. Be present and love What I didn’t expect was the incredible love that was offered to me. I also didn’t expect the beautiful, caring, loving, genuine community that I got to be part of–a community that looks a lot like church, but in whom many have been rejected by church. I had deep conversations about faith, life, heartache, love, rejection, belonging, and yes, God.  And you know what? He is fully there in a marginalized people who the mainstream church wants to reject. God has not rejected them. Just a few days ago I had the opportunity to again be immersed in that culture, but this time in my hometown. The experience was beautiful. I’m still processing this new story, which is the old story of Jesus and his love–I’m not sure where God is taking me, but my heart is open. My moments in this culture feel very holy. That was unexpected.

Story.

People can dispute Bible verses all day long. They can’t dispute our personal encounters with a living, loving God who is writing us into his story so that our stories can write into the lives of those around us.

I know stories about both of my grandmothers and their Jesus love lived out in action. I know the stories of my parents and their Jesus love lived out in action. I share those stories–shared one about my dad last week.  A new generation is hearing those stories.

What is your current story? If your story, your testimony is about a one time event that happened years ago, it is time to pay attention. The God who sees us also speaks to us. My butterfly encounter is about Jesus and his love. My time with marginalized people is about Jesus and his love. My heritage of faithful Christ followers is about Jesus and his love. There are countless ways that Jesus tells his story through our lives, so that we will, in turn, tell those stories through our lives. How has he showed you he loves you today? What current journey are you on with him? Are we paying attention? Are we sharing with others? Do we love to tell the stories, of Jesus and his love?

–Luanne

“The “old, old story of Jesus and his love” is not stale. Nothing about the living God ever grows stagnant. The old, old story is flowing fresh today…” 

The old, old story of Jesus cannot be contained within the story of his death and resurrection–and yet, it can…because every God story, every encounter with the risen Christ is, at its core, one of death and resurrection. That old story is the story of God’s self-emptying love that most clearly shows us his heart toward all of humanity through the death and resurrection of Jesus. And he keeps showing up with that same love, infusing all of our stories with that one story. But if we don’t let it come to life within our personal stories, if we don’t have eyes to see the cycle of death and resurrection in our own lives, it can become–to us–stale and stagnant words on a page that we say we believe, but that stop short of affecting our actual lives. But, if we pay attention, we’ll see that what Luanne said is true: “The old, old story is flowing fresh today…’

Luanne also wrote, “The old hymn above says I love to tell the story…of Jesus and his love. Do we? And if so, what story are we telling? And later, she asked us, “What is your current story?” 

Her questions seemed easy enough to answer at first glance. But as I let those questions sink deeper, past the surface of things, I got a little squirmy. The kind of squirmy that let me know what direction my writing would take today… (ugh.)

I wrote above that every encounter with the risen Christ is one of death and resurrection. I really do believe that. It’s the way of the upside-down kingdom we’ve written so much about. I don’t know about you, but I prefer to talk about the resurrection parts. The thing is, though, you don’t have resurrection without death. And death can make us uncomfortable and afraid. Even though it’s a part of life… As Jesus followers, we are seed people, resurrection people–people who embrace death as part of the cycle of life. The late Rachel Held Evans, in her beautiful book Searching for Sunday, wrote:

“Death is something empires worry about, not something gardeners worry about. It’s certainly not something resurrection people worry about.”

And yet, we hate the death parts, don’t we? It’s what makes Luanne’s questions complicated for me to answer…

Do I love to tell the story? That depends on which parts I’m telling… I’ve made peace with a lot of the chapters in my past, seen them through new eyes, and–by God’s good grace– I have found a way to love even the hardest parts of my God story. If this were her only question, I might have been able to say, yes, I love to tell the story of Jesus and his love in my life. On occasion. When I feel safe enough to go there…

But then she asked, “What is your current story?”

I don’t really want to answer that…because I don’t love my current story very much yet. The chapter that is in process is difficult to embrace most days. This chapter, so far, includes questions about the faith I’ve always known and loved, finding irreconcilable differences in the God I grew up with and the God I’m learning he actually is, and a growing awareness of the barriers the Church has built that have contributed to–and even caused–systemic and societal issues that are keeping people from seeing Jesus. I’ve never been lonelier, despite the many dear companions God has gifted me with. I’ve never felt more conflicted over speaking up versus staying quiet, never questioned so deeply who I can actually trust. The pages of this chapter are full of unknowns and an instability that often leaves me breathless. The stress level is unprecedented. Fear–especially of the future–visits often, an uninvited companion on this shadowy journey. The tears flow daily. It is a chapter wrought with betrayals and cutting words from unlikely places, but also from familiar places where it has become the norm. If I had to title this chapter in progress, I might call it “The Cloak of Invisibility”, because I’ve never felt less seen and less known.

Do I love my current story? Um…no. Are there days I want to run away from all the things that feel like pressure and conflict and chaos all around me? Almost every day. There are moments that I have to remind myself to breathe, moments when I literally feel paralyzed and unable to move forward. This is the first time I’m telling this much of this chapter’s story, and believe me, I don’t love telling one bit of it. I’m currently pondering deleting every word and starting from scratch in an entirely different direction.

Do you know what’s stopping me from doing just that? Jesus, and his love…

This isn’t the first chapter of my story that has felt unlovable. It won’t be the last. And if I’m honest, my God-story contains more chapters that are hard than are easy, more ugly than beautiful. But do you know what every single chapter contains? The thread of Jesus and his love woven into the tapestry of me. In every chapter, you’ll find death and resurrection, in equal amounts. Every part of my story is overlaid with the story of Jesus and his self-emptying, always pursuing love. Including this one. I may not see it yet, but I can trust that as long as my story is being written, it is inseparably woven together with the thread of Jesus and his love. His love redeems the ugly parts and renames them beautiful. He takes the unlovable chapters and renames them Beloved. Every season, no matter how devastating, contains death and resurrection.

Luanne wrote about a season that left her world in shambles. It was a season during which some things died–a long winter of sorts. The deaths that occurred, though, cleared the way for resurrection, renewal. And throughout that season of dying, God gave her Swallowtails. A butterfly. A symbol of spring. Possibly the best illustration we have of death and resurrection in our created world. A caterpillar is hidden within the cloak of its cocoon. And while it’s in there, it literally dies. Its organs disintegrate, and from that soup of cells, a butterfly is born. When the time is right, the cloak of the cocoon falls away, and the beautiful butterfly is free to fly. Death and resurrection. For Luanne, loving her whole God story means embracing every part of it, as each chapter led her to today. Swallowtail sightings, while still breathtaking and beautiful, wouldn’t carry the same weight in her story had it not been an icon of God’s love for her that carried her through a season of death and into resurrection.

The same is true for all of us. To love our stories means to embrace every chapter, and to learn to hold death and resurrection as equally necessary parts of the narrative. Once we can do that, we can learn to love telling our stories as well.

Diane spoke about sharing our stories with our kids as an act of worship to God. I agree that anytime we share our stories with anyone, it is an act of worship. 1 Peter 3:15 exhorts us,

But have reverence for Christ in your hearts, and honor him as Lord. Be ready at all times to answer anyone who asks you to explain the hope you have in you (GNT)

I believe that our answer for our hope goes beyond quoting verses that we have memorized. Of course sharing scripture is good, and sometimes appropriate, but if that’s all we do, we run the risk of handing people a stale, stagnant story… Our answer for our hope has to include our one, unique, vulnerable story of our personal experience encountering the love of Jesus. When we share in this way, we pull up a chair to the ever-expanding communion table of Christ and enter into authentic community with one another.

Sometimes it takes sharing the chapters we love the least to move toward embracing our whole stories.

It takes courage, but when we share, we might be surprised at the results…

When I wrote above that I might title my current chapter “The Cloak of Invisibility”, I had no idea I would be writing about the cloak of the cocoon in relation to Luanne’s story. As I wrote about it though, I started to experience my own cloak differently, as I wondered,

Could this cloak be a cocoon that is enshrouding me while the necessary deaths take place for new life to grow once again? Is the invisibility I feel maybe a protection while God rearranges me piece by piece, guarding me from the intrusion of predators that would attempt to thwart the process? 

In the pondering, I can feel myself already beginning to embrace my current story. Hope is sprouting from seeds of discouragement that fell into the soil of Jesus’ love. Why? Because Luanne shared her story. And even though it’s a story I know well, it fell fresh on my heart today and impacted my own. Perhaps my current story will impact one of yours and maybe then you’ll share with someone else. And as we continue in this way, we’ll keep making space at the table for all of our stories.

So, to wrap things up, I’ll ask Luanne’s questions again–will you answer them?

“The old hymn above says: I love to tell the story…of Jesus and his love. Do we? And if so, what story are we telling? What is your current story?” 

–Laura

When the Enemy Comes: Revelation

The last few weeks Pastor John has been teaching us how to navigate seasons of devastation by leading us through a series from the book of Joel.

We have read verses in Joel that tell us about the hoards of locusts that wiped out the land and the crops. We’ve read about the drought and the fire. We’ve read the verses in which the Lord encourages the people to return to Him with all their hearts (2:13). We’ve read about His compassion and love (v.13). We’ve read Joel’s words as he begins to remember who the Lord is and exclaims “Surely He has done great things!” (v. 20 and 21). We’ve read God’s promise to restore the land with the result being that His people will praise His name and know that He is their God, that there is no other, and they will never be shamed again. (vs. 25-27)  Joel teaches us to:

  1. Return–cry out to God.
  2. Remember-recall who God is and all that He has done.
  3. Restore-regain perspective that God is good, that He is for us, that He loves us, and this week:
  4. Revelation-God’s invitation to be part of what He is doing through His Spirit.

And afterward, I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy, your old men will dream dreams, your young men will see visions. even on my servants, both men and women, I will pour out my Spirit in those days. (2:28-29)

The Hebrew word “prophesy” means to speak or sing under the influence of divine spirit. It can mean to “pour forth words”, to declare, to speak by divine power, sometimes it rebukes the wicked, sometimes it declares events to come, sometimes it means to sing holy songs as led by the Spirit of God, it can mean to teach, to declare God’s truth.  The Greek word expounds a little further, it can mean to impulsively burst forth in praise or discourse, it can mean to comfort someone, to declare a thing which can only be known by divine revelation.  Basically, it is to be open to whatever the Spirit of God wants to communicate from God or about God in whatever way He chooses. God is, after all, God.

Joel’s prophecy was written at a time when the Holy Spirit only came upon certain people empowering them to accomplish God’s purpose in that season. They were typically empowered with great strength, or powerful speech, as in Samson, David, the prophets, some kings, some priests, some judges. They carried out the work of the Lord. One man who sometimes gets overlooked in all of this was Bezalel, so I want to give him a mention here. In Exodus 31, God told Moses: See, I have chosen Bezalel…and I have filled him with the Spirit of God, with wisdom and understanding, with knowledge and with all kinds of skills to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver and bronze, to cut and set stones, to work in wood and to engage in all kinds of crafts…(Ex. 31:1-4). Even a craftsman/artist can be filled with the Spirit of God to accomplish God’s purpose and point us to God through his/her art. I love that!

The people of Joel’s day did not see the fulfillment of that particular prophecy.  As a matter of fact, another prophet, Amos, prophesied that God would send a famine of hearing the words of the Lord, (Amos 8:11) The Old Testament ends with the book of Malachi and God’s plea for His people to return to Him. They don’t, which leads to 400 years of silence from God.  I can’t begin to imagine!

After those 400 years, Jesus is born.

God, right here.

Visible, touchable, relatable.

God, showing us who He is and what He is about in the person of Jesus. God showing us His loving heart. God showing us His power. God showing us His kindness. God showing us that there is no life in religious ritual.  God showing us His righteous indignation at injustice. God showing us that there is no “us and them” in His kingdom. God lifting the marginalized, the oppressed, the invisible. God showing us that we are all precious to Him. God showing us His sacrificial nature.  And God making a way for us to become part of His family and His mission to restore all things as His kingdom begins to expand across the world.

Before He was crucified, Jesus told his closest friends that the gift of the Holy Spirit was going to come to them (John 14). After his resurrection, right before he ascended, he told his closest friends that they would receive power to be His witnesses when the Holy Spirit came upon them. (Acts 1:8) After he ascended, his friends returned to Jerusalem, went upstairs to the room where they were staying, and spent time in prayer. Luke makes sure we know that Mary and the women were with them in that room. (Acts 1:14).

And then, in Acts 2 it happens. The Holy Spirit came upon them–all of them. They were filled with the Spirit and the Spirit enabled them to speak in other tongues. They went outside and began to speak to people from every nation. Those people were bewildered because they each heard their own language being spoken–and what were they hearing? The wonders of God being declared!

However, as is often the case when the Spirit is on the move, there were naysayers in the crowd who were making fun of them and accusing them of being drunk. And then Peter, who in his fear had denied Jesus just a few weeks before

Stood up

Raised his voice

And explained the mystery of what was happening to the crowd.

He began with Joel’s prophecy:

In the last days, God says, I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy, your young men will see visions, your old men will dream dreams. Even on my servants, both men and women, I will pour out my Spirit in those days, and they will prophesy. I will show wonders in the heavens above and signs on the earth below….and everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.  (Acts 2:17-21).

Then Peter, with the other apostles standing with him, went on to explain who Jesus is. He reminded the people that they rejected Him, but that they were being given a new opportunity to recognize that Jesus is the Messiah. He encouraged them to repent–to change their minds about the way they thought about Jesus–to be baptized for the forgiveness of their sins, to receive the Holy Spirit–and about three thousand people became followers of Jesus on that day. Wow!

The rest of the book of Acts records the amazing things that the Holy Spirit did through the apostles, through Paul, through the followers of Christ and the early church as they were filled with the Spirit. The same Spirit is still available to all of us today–available to women and men, to rich and poor, to educated and uneducated, to every tribe, every tongue, every nation, every individual–all of us. 

So, the question for us is–do we give the Spirit free reign in our lives or are we afraid to allow that? There were naysayers in Peter’s audience, and there were those who were open to Peter’s pretty hard and pointed message. Those who were open felt their hearts being “pricked” which led them to ask “What shall we do?”  Then Peter, through the power of the Holy Spirit shared with them how to come into a relationship with Jesus and how to receive the Holy Spirit.

Where do you find yourself? Are you a naysayer? Are you open to the conviction of the Holy Spirit? Are you open to the empowerment of the Holy Spirit? Are you open to the ministry of the Holy Spirit in your life, producing the fruit of the Spirit in your thoughts and actions? Are you open to giving the Spirit full reign to use your talents, your gifts, your personality, your all to bring glory to God and draw others into His presence and kingdom? Are you open to things you don’t understand and can’t explain? Are you willing to follow the lead of the Holy Spirit even if it feels a little weird and uncomfortable to your flesh? Are you willing to let the Holy Spirit stretch you and teach you new things? Are you willing to let the Holy Spirit “mess in your business”? The fulfillment of Joel’s prophecy is still happening today. The purpose of the prophecy remains the same–that everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.

I truly believe that without the presence, empowerment, and ministry of the Holy Spirit in our individual lives, we cannot have unity in the Church, loving relationships, compelling lives, and be part of the fulfillment of God’s heart desire for all people to know Him. It’s a big deal. Where do you stand?

…how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!” Luke 11:13. 

For the sake of His kingdom and glory–are we asking?

–Luanne

I am going to pick up exactly where Luanne left off…

“For the sake of His kingdom and glory–are we asking?”

Our individual answers to this question will be more nuanced than a simple yes or no. To answer honestly, we have to consider the role that the Spirit played in our original theological framework. What we have heard, seen, and been taught about the Holy Spirit drives our thoughts, expectations, and fears related to this mysterious entity that cannot be fully explained or understood.

If our answer to this question is yes, there are some follow-up questions…  Why are we asking? Are we asking because we want to prove our superiority or spirituality? Have we been told we should? How are we asking? Are we asking with open hands and hearts, willing to receive whatever God chooses to give? Or are we asking with conditions and specific expectations?

If our answer is no, there is one follow-up question: Why not?

When Luanne wrote about Pentecost–when the Holy Spirit came upon Jesus’ disciples and friends like a rushing wind, with flames of fire–she mentioned that those who heard them speaking after this pouring out, under the empowerment of the Spirit, were bewildered...

Bewildered: deeply or utterly confused or perplexed (Merriam-Webster.com)

I read about this very thing recently in a book titled How to Survive a Shipwreck, by Jonathan Martin. He writes:

“When the Spirit blows in, the first sign of the divine presence is not order, but confusion. When the early disciples were filled with the Spirit and began to speak in other tongues, the world around them was bewildered. It is the first and most neglected sign that God is up to something extraordinary–bewilderment… Only the people who don’t know what they are doing or where their lives are headed are open to the Spirit in the wind. The trademark of the Spirit is to first bewilder, not clarify. The fog that comes doesn’t always obscure the Spirit–sometimes it is the Spirit. To welcome Pentecost is to open ourselves to the possibility that God may be working in that which at first only appears to be confusion.”

I’m going to go ahead and say here that we do not like this. We tend, as followers of Jesus from many different backgrounds, to pray for clarity, for peace that calms the chaos, for answers-not more questions.

But if our God is really God, then part of what differentiates Him from us is our inability to grasp Him.

And yet, we try…

Since the beginning of recorded history (and probably before that…) we, as humanity, have been attempting to box God in. To simplify all that He is into terms we can understand and explain. We long for a sense of order and control, and we have tried to control God. We have convinced ourselves (and sadly, many others along with us…) that God can be managed, manipulated, and controlled if we follow certain sets of rules and color within the lines. Religiosity replaces relationship and we think that neat and tidy looking lives are evidence of our right standing with the Creator of all things.

My heart aches as I type, because this understanding of “faith” that so many have adapted and then taught, reduces our beautiful, mysterious and incomprehensible Creator to a list of dos and donts. This is a tragedy. No wonder the world around us wants nothing to do with our “God”. People aren’t really rejecting us and our “God” because of declining morality, or even an aversion to our “Christian” intolerance.

They just don’t want the picture we have painted of our God.

There’s little that is appealing about how modern “Christianity” displays our Leader. The depravity in the world is deepening because followers of Jesus have picked up artificial light that is powerless to pierce the darkness, and set aside the true Light that has the power to draw ALL men to Himself…

We have largely rejected the mysteries of God, because of our inability to control what we don’t understand. And the greatest mystery of God, or at least one of the greatest mysteries, is His Spirit.

Luanne wrote, “So, the question for us is–do we give the Spirit free reign in our lives or are we afraid to allow that?”

If our core desire is to maintain a sense of control and order in our lives, then I think we have to own that–when it comes to the uncontrollable, bewildering Spirit of God–we are, in fact, afraid.

Luanne asked a series of follow-up questions, one of which was, “Are you open to giving the Spirit full reign to use your talents, your gifts, your personality, your all to bring glory to God and draw others into His presence and kingdom?”

If we can get past the fear in the previous question, and begin to embrace the “free reign” of the Spirit in our hearts and lives, this next question contains components we MUST wrestle with…

If we give the Spirit full, unmediated access to our talents, gifts, and personalities–the very make-up of who we are–that means we are saying God gets to determine the how, when, where, and why about what we are and what we have. He gets to decide move us and move through us His way. If we thought we were losing control before, this part can pretty well undo us… We have ideas about what we can and can’t do. We know what we would like to do with the gifts we have been given, and where we like to use them. We know what we’re comfortable doing and saying within the scope of our own personalities, and what is well beyond our comfort zones.

But the thing is… the Spirit of God can move within us and empower us with talents and gifts we didn’t know we had. The Spirit, at times, even unleashes gifting within us that we’ve never had and couldn’t dream of having. But in order to experience this kind of empowerment, we must let go of our preconceived notions, our expectations, our assumptions, and all of our conditions. We have to assume a posture of receiving with humility, expectant that God will show up, but without presumption of how He will choose to do that.

Peter knew something about this. He, along with the others, had been told to wait for the Spirit to come. Jesus didn’t really give them more detail than that. Wait for the Spirit to come upon you. So, together, they waited. Expectant, but wholly unprepared for what was about to happen. And when the Spirit showed up with the force of a mighty wind and with fire, they received the empowerment. But it went further than that. They didn’t simply receive… they also moved. They moved out among the people with a boldness not their own.

Both John, in his message, and Luanne in her portion of this post, referred to Peter’s first sermon. They both reminded us that Peter stood up with the others and spoke to the crowds–and about 3,000 were added to their number that day. He spoke bold words, for sure. But the more baffling mystery here is that he spoke at all

This is Peter… Peter, who famously had denied Jesus not long before this day, in front of those he was now speaking to, yes. But beyond that, this was Peter, who, up to this point was known for being anything but eloquent… We have evidence throughout the gospels of the trainwreck that often occurred whenever Peter would open his mouth. He was always saying the wrong thing. He was most definitely not a natural, gifted speaker. Obviously. This was not a talent he had been born with. It was was a gift that he was empowered with when he chose to give the Spirit full access to all of himself

What we also know about Peter is that what he lacked throughout the four gospels in eloquence, he made up for with his inexhaustible trust in Jesus. In fact, it was his bubbling trust and belief that led him into some of the verbal blunders that we have recorded in our Bible.

I believe it was this same trust, belief, faith, reliance on Jesus that freed Peter to stand up and speak, empowered with a gift he didn’t know he possessed.

The same is available to us. If we can overcome our fear and lean hard into the mystery of our God and the freedom of His Spirit, we can be empowered with gifts we’ve never had before, too. We won’t all speak, or sing, or prophecy in the very same way. That would negate the very mystery we’re attempting to embrace. The empowerment can take innumerable forms, because we follow an uncontainable, unexplalinable God. If we are willing to receive the mystery, to be empowered by what we cannot understand, and to move within that empowerment, we will begin to see and experience what Jesus was talking about when He said these things:

I tell you the truth, anyone who believes in me will do the same works I have done, and even greater works, because I am going to be with the Father. (John 14:12, NLT)

It’s better for you that I leave. If I don’t leave, the Friend won’t come. But if I go, I’ll send him to you. (John 16:7, Message)

How do we do the “greater works” Jesus prophesied we would do? Under the empowerment of the friend that was given to us, that Jesus said was better for us than even His physical Presence among us.

Jesus told us the indwelling power of His Spirit was better for us than Him remaining here would be… That is huge. Jesus wouldn’t have said it if it were not true. If we believe him, friends, we had better be asking for this “better” that has been already been given. Whatever we may or may not have been taught about the Spirit in our upbringings or faith traditions–however impactful those words and ideas may have been–if we’re followers of Jesus, His words have to carry the most weight. He says we need the Spirit. And He says we get to have as much of this gift as we want. The question is, do we want it?

“…how much more will the heavenly Father give the Holy Spirit to those who ask him!” (Luke 11:13)

–Laura

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